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Found 56 result(s)
Welcome to INTERMAGNET - the global network of observatories, monitoring the Earth's magnetic field. At this site you can find data and information from geomagnetic observatories around the world. The INTERMAGNET programme exists to establish a global network of cooperating digital magnetic observatories, adopting modern standard specifications for measuring and recording equipment, in order to facilitate data exchanges and the production of geomagnetic products in close to real time.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
ShareGeo Open is a spatial data repository that promotes data sharing between creators and users of spatial data. It is the place where researchers, students and lecturers at UK HEFE institutions can deposit data for anyone to download and use. This will both increase the use of spatial data and forge links between data creators and data consumers. Data held in ShareGeo Open can also be discovered through aggregating search portals such as Go- Geo!. ShareGeo Open was developed as part of EDINA’s continuing goal to ensure continuity of access to data for the UK academic and education sector
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Go-Geo is an online resource discovery tool which allows for the identification and retrieval of records describing the content, quality, condition and other characteristics of geospatial data that exist with UK tertiary education and beyond. The portal supports geospatial searching by interactive map, grid co-ordinates and place name, as well as the more traditional topic or keyword forms of searching. The portal is a key component of the UK academic Spatial Data Infrastructure.
The HMAP Data Pages are a research resource comprising of information derived largely from historical records relating to fishing catches and effort in selected spatial and temporal contexts. The History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP), the historical component of the Census of Marine Life, aimed to improve our understanding of ecosystem dynamics, specifically with regard to long-term changes in stock abundance, the ecological impact of large-scale harvesting by man, and the role of marine resources in the historical development of human society. HMAP data is also accessible through the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS): http://www.iobis.org/, see also: http://seamap.env.duke.edu/dataset
The figshare service for The Open University was launched in 2016 and allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
Protectedplanet.net combines crowd sourcing and authoritative sources to enrich and provide data for protected areas around the world. Data are provided in partnership with the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA). The data include the location, designation type, status year, and size of the protected areas, as well as species information.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through managing data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis. The CEDA Archive operates the atmospheric and earth observation data centre functions on behalf of NERC for the UK atmospheric science and earth observation communities. It covers climate, composition, observations and NWP data as well as various earth observation datasets, including airborne and satellite data and imagery. Prior to November 2016 these functions were operted by CEDA under the titles of the British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) and the NERC Earth Observation Data Centre (NEODC). CEDA also operates the UK Solar System Data Centre (UKSSDC), which curates and provides access to archives of data from the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and Earth's solar environment.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
GeoCommons is the public community of GeoIQ users who are building an open repository of data and maps for the world. The GeoIQ platform includes a large number of features that empower you to easily access, visualize and analyze your data. The GeoIQ platform powers the growing GeoCommons community of over 25,000 members actively creating and sharing hundreds of thousands of datasets and maps across the world. With GeoCommons, anyone can contribute and share open data, easily build shareable maps and collaborate with others.
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
SeaDataNet is a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet infrastructure network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. As a research infrastructure, SeaDataNet contributes to build research excellence in Europe.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.