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Found 122 result(s)
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
eCrystals - Southampton is the archive for Crystal Structures generated by the Southampton Chemical Crystallography Group and the EPSRC UK National Crystallography Service.
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
Surrey Research Insight (SRI) is an open access resource that hosts, preserves and disseminates the full text of scholarly papers produced by members of the University of Surrey. Its main purpose is to help Surrey authors make their research more widely known; their ideas and findings readily accessible; and their papers more frequently read and cited. Surrey Research Insight (formerly Surrey Scholarship Online) was developed in line with the Open Access Initiative, promoting free access to scholarship for the benefit of authors and scholars. It is one of many open access repositories around the world that operate on agreed standards to ensure wide and timely dissemination of research.
Welcome to INTERMAGNET - the global network of observatories, monitoring the Earth's magnetic field. At this site you can find data and information from geomagnetic observatories around the world. The INTERMAGNET programme exists to establish a global network of cooperating digital magnetic observatories, adopting modern standard specifications for measuring and recording equipment, in order to facilitate data exchanges and the production of geomagnetic products in close to real time.
The Durham High Energy Physics Database (HEPData), formerly: the Durham HEPData Project, has been built up over the past four decades as a unique open-access repository for scattering data from experimental particle physics. It currently comprises the data points from plots and tables related to several thousand publications including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Durham HepData Project has for more than 25 years compiled the Reactions Database containing what can be loosly described as cross sections from HEP scattering experiments. The data comprise total and differential cross sections, structure functions, fragmentation functions, distributions of jet measures, polarisations, etc... from a wide range of interactions. In the new HEPData site (hepdata.net), you can explore new functionalities for data providers and data consumers, as well as the submission interface. HEPData is operated by CERN and IPPP at Durham University and is based on the digital library framework Invenio.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
Chempound is a new generation repository architecture based on RDF, semantic dictionaries and linked data. It has been developed to hold any type of chemical object expressible in CML and is exemplified by crystallographic experiments and computational chemistry calculations. In both examples, the repository can hold >50k entries which can be searched by SPARQL endpoints and pre-indexing of key fields. The Chempound architecture is general and adaptable to other fields of data-rich science.
DataBank is a repository that will keep data safe in the long term. It can automatically obtain a Digital Object Indicator (DOI) for each data package, and make the metadata and/or the underlying data searchable and accessible by the wider world.
Open Research Exeter (ORE) is the University of Exeter's repository for all types of research, including research papers, research data and theses. Research in ORE can be viewed and downloaded freely by anyone, anywhere: researchers, students, industry, business and the wider public. ORE's content includes journal articles, conference papers, working papers, reports, book chapters, videos, audio, images, multimedia research project outputs, raw data and analysed data. ORE's content is securely stored, managed and preserved to ensure free, permanent access.
The Spiral Digital Repository is the Imperial College London institutional open access repository. This system allows you, as an author, to make your research documents open access without incurring additional publication costs. When you self-archive a research document in Spiral it becomes free for anyone to read. You can upload copies of your publications to Spiral using Symplectic Elements. All deposited content becomes searchable online.
The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
The figshare service for the University of Sheffield allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
The BGS is a data-rich organisation with over 400 datasets in its care; including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives. Our data is managed by the National Geoscience Data Centre.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles, conference proceedings and research data made open access.
ShareGeo Open is a spatial data repository that promotes data sharing between creators and users of spatial data. It is the place where researchers, students and lecturers at UK HEFE institutions can deposit data for anyone to download and use. This will both increase the use of spatial data and forge links between data creators and data consumers. Data held in ShareGeo Open can also be discovered through aggregating search portals such as Go- Geo!. ShareGeo Open was developed as part of EDINA’s continuing goal to ensure continuity of access to data for the UK academic and education sector
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Go-Geo is an online resource discovery tool which allows for the identification and retrieval of records describing the content, quality, condition and other characteristics of geospatial data that exist with UK tertiary education and beyond. The portal supports geospatial searching by interactive map, grid co-ordinates and place name, as well as the more traditional topic or keyword forms of searching. The portal is a key component of the UK academic Spatial Data Infrastructure.