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Found 282 result(s)
The 1000 Genomes Project is an international collaboration to produce an extensive public catalog of human genetic variation, including SNPs and structural variants, and their haplotype contexts. This resource will support genome-wide association studies and other medical research studies. The genomes of about 2500 unidentified people from about 25 populations around the world will be sequenced using next-generation sequencing technologies. The results of the study will be freely and publicly accessible to researchers worldwide. The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR) has been established at EMBL-EBI to continue supporting data generated by the 1000 Genomes Project, supplemented with new data and new analysis.
The University has followed all of the children born in Aberdeen in 1921, 1936, and 1950-1956 as they grow and age. Collectively these groups are known as the ABERDEEN BIRTH COHORTS, and are a jewel in the crown of Scottish health research and have helped to advance our understanding of aging well. The Children of the 1950s study is a population-based resource for the study of biological and social influences on health across the life-course and between generations.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
The Agricultural and Environmental Data Archive (AEDA) is the direct result of a project managed by the Freshwater Biological Association in partnership with the Centre for e-Research at King's College London, and funded by the Department for the Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra). This project ran from January 2011 until December 2014 and was called the DTC Archive Project, because it was initially related to the Demonstration Test Catchments Platform developed by Defra. The archive was also designed to hold data from the GHG R&D Platform (www.ghgplatform.org.uk). After the DTC Archive Project was completed the finished archive was renamed as AEDA to reflect it's broader remit to archive data from any and all agricultural and environmental research activities.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
ALSoD is a freely available database that has been transformed from a single gene storage facility recording mutations in the SOD1 gene to a multigene ALS bioinformatics repository and analytical instrument combining genotype, phenotype, and geographical information with associated analysis tools. These include a comparison tool to evaluate genes side by side or jointly with user configurable features, a pathogenicity prediction tool using a combination of computational approaches to distinguish variants with nonfunctional characteristics from disease-associated mutations with more dangerous consequences, and a credibility tool to enable ALS researchers to objectively assess the evidence for gene causation in ALS. Furthermore, integration of external tools, systems for feedback, annotation by users, and two-way links to collaborators hosting complementary databases further enhance the functionality of ALSoD.
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While focused on supporting the scientific community, ATCC activities range widely, from repository-related operations to providing specialized services, conducting in-house R&D and intellectual property management. ATCC serves U.S. and international researchers by characterizing cell lines, bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, as well as developing and evaluating assays and techniques for validating research resources and preserving and distributing biological materials to the public and private sector research communities. Our management philosophy emphasizes customer satisfaction, value addition, cost-effective operations and competitive benchmarking for all areas of our enterprise.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
The ADS is an accredited digital repository for heritage data that supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources by preserving and disseminating digital data in the long term. The ADS also promotes good practice in the use of digital data, provides technical advice to the heritage community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
ArkDB is a generic, species-independent database built to capture the state of published information on genome mapping in a given species. It stores details of references, markers and loci and genetic linkage and cytogenetic maps which can be drawn using the online map-drawing application. Data from linkage maps held within the ArkDB system can be drawn alongside their corresponding genome sequence maps (extracted from ENSEMBL).
Aston Data Explorer is Aston University's repository for our research datasets. It is one of three services providing information about Aston University’s research. Aston Publications Explorer (coming early 2017) holds Aston's Open Access publications and Aston Research Explorer has broader information about Aston's research work including research staff, awards and activities, projects and research groups.
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) from the Hoffmann lab and other contributors is a nationally significant life science collection. The Drosophila Clinal Data Collection contains data on populations along the eastern coast of Australia. It remains an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. The Drosophila Genomic Data Collection hosts Drosophila genomes sequenced as part of the Genomic Basis for Adaptation to Climate Change Project. 23 genomes have been sequenced as part of this project. Currently assemblies and annotations are available for Drosophila birchii, D. bunnanda, D. hydei, and D. repleta. The Drosophila Species Distribution Data Collection contains distribution data of nine drosophilid species that have been collected in Australia by the Hoffmann lab and other research groups between 1924 and 2005. More than 300 drosophilid species have been identified in the tropical and temperate forests located on the east coast of Australia. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Their varied distribution along the tropical - temperate cline provide a powerful tool for studying climate adaptation and species distribution limits.
ALSPAC is a longitudinal birth cohort study which enrolled pregnant women who were resident in one of three Bristol-based health districts in the former County of Avon with an expected delivery date between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992. Around 14,000 pregnant women were initially recruited. Detailed information has been collected on these women, their partners and subsequent children using self-completion questionnaires, data extraction from medical notes, linkage to routine information systems and from hands-on research clinics. Additional cohorts of participants have since been enrolled in their own right including fathers, siblings, children of the children and grandparents of the children. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ALSPAC Ethics and Law Committee (IRB00003312) and Local Research Ethics.
The University research data repository – BathSPAdata – enables staff to upload their research data into a secure space, and to share this data publicly where appropriate, or where funders or publishers require this as part of their conditions. Resources and toolkits for external use can be made available through this forum, and can be used by Schools, policy makers, business and industry, and the cultural sector.
BeiDare2 is currently at beta version. All new users should try the new service as we no longer provide training for the classic BioDare. - BioDare stands for Biological Data Repository, its main focus is data from circadian experiments. BioDare is an online facility to share, store, analyse and disseminate timeseries data, focussing on circadian clock data, with browser and web service interfaces. Toolbox features include an improved, speedier FFT-NLLs routine and ROBuST’s Spectrum Resampling tool that will analyse rhythmic time series data.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets (BioGRID) is a public database that archives and disseminates genetic and protein interaction data from model organisms and humans. BioGRID is an online interaction repository with data compiled through comprehensive curation efforts. All interaction data are freely provided through our search index and available via download in a wide variety of standardized formats.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
BioModels is a repository of mathematical models of biological and biomedical systems. It hosts a vast selection of existing literature-based physiologically and pharmaceutically relevant mechanistic models in standard formats. Our mission is to provide the systems modelling community with reproducible, high-quality, freely-accessible models published in the scientific literature.
Content type(s)
BioSamples stores and supplies descriptions and metadata about biological samples used in research and development by academia and industry. Samples are either 'reference' samples (e.g. from 1000 Genomes, HipSci, FAANG) or have been used in an assay database such as the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) or ArrayExpress.
The BioStudies database holds descriptions of biological studies, links to data from these studies in other databases at EMBL-EBI or outside, as well as data that do not fit in the structured archives at EMBL-EBI. The database accepts submissions via an online tool, or in a simple tab-delimited format. It also enables authors to submit supplementary information and link to it from the publication.
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.