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Found 146 result(s)
eCrystals - Southampton is the archive for Crystal Structures generated by the Southampton Chemical Crystallography Group and the EPSRC UK National Crystallography Service.
The Old Bailey Proceedings Online makes available a fully searchable, digitised collection of all surviving editions of the Old Bailey Proceedings from 1674 to 1913, and of the Ordinary of Newgate's Accounts between 1676 and 1772. It allows access to over 197,000 trials and biographical details of approximately 2,500 men and women executed at Tyburn, free of charge for non-commercial use. In addition to the text, accessible through both keyword and structured searching, this website provides digital images of all 190,000 original pages of the Proceedings, 4,000 pages of Ordinary's Accounts, advice on methods of searching this resource, information on the historical and legal background to the Old Bailey court and its Proceedings, and descriptions of published and manuscript materials relating to the trials covered. Contemporary maps, and images have also been provided.
Galaxies, made up of billions of stars like our Sun, are the beacons that light up the structure of even the most distant regions in space. Not all galaxies are alike, however. They come in very different shapes and have very different properties; they may be large or small, old or young, red or blue, regular or confused, luminous or faint, dusty or gas-poor, rotating or static, round or disky, and they live either in splendid isolation or in clusters. In other words, the universe contains a very colourful and diverse zoo of galaxies. For almost a century, astronomers have been discussing how galaxies should be classified and how they relate to each other in an attempt to attack the big question of how galaxies form. Galaxy Zoo (Lintott et al. 2008, 2011) pioneered a novel method for performing large-scale visual classifications of survey datasets. This webpage allows anyone to download the resulting GZ classifications of galaxies in the project.
EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Public Image Archive, is a public resource for raw, 2D electron microscopy images. Here, you can browse, upload, download and reprocess the thousands of raw, 2D images used to build a 3D structure. The purpose of EMPIAR is to provide an easy access to the state-of-the-art raw data to facilitate methods development and validation, which will lead to better 3D structures. It complements the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), where 3D images are stored, and uses the fault-tolerant Aspera platform for data transfers
Surrey Research Insight (SRI) is an open access resource that hosts, preserves and disseminates the full text of scholarly papers produced by members of the University of Surrey. Its main purpose is to help Surrey authors make their research more widely known; their ideas and findings readily accessible; and their papers more frequently read and cited. Surrey Research Insight (formerly Surrey Scholarship Online) was developed in line with the Open Access Initiative, promoting free access to scholarship for the benefit of authors and scholars. It is one of many open access repositories around the world that operate on agreed standards to ensure wide and timely dissemination of research.
The UK Data Service is a comprehensive resource funded by the ESRC to support researchers, teachers and policymakers who depend on high-quality social and economic data. Here you will find a single point of access to a wide range of secondary data including large-scale government surveys, international macrodata, business microdata, qualitative studies and census data.
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
The Durham High Energy Physics Database (HEPData), formerly: the Durham HEPData Project, has been built up over the past four decades as a unique open-access repository for scattering data from experimental particle physics. It currently comprises the data points from plots and tables related to several thousand publications including those from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The Durham HepData Project has for more than 25 years compiled the Reactions Database containing what can be loosly described as cross sections from HEP scattering experiments. The data comprise total and differential cross sections, structure functions, fragmentation functions, distributions of jet measures, polarisations, etc... from a wide range of interactions. In the new HEPData site (hepdata.net), you can explore new functionalities for data providers and data consumers, as well as the submission interface. HEPData is operated by CERN and IPPP at Durham University and is based on the digital library framework Invenio.
The BioStudies database holds descriptions of biological studies, links to data from these studies in other databases at EMBL-EBI or outside, as well as data that do not fit in the structured archives at EMBL-EBI. The database accepts submissions via an online tool, or in a simple tab-delimited format. It also enables authors to submit supplementary information and link to it from the publication.
SAHFOS is an internationally funded independent research non-profit organisation responsible for the operation of the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Survey. As a large-scale global survey, it provides the scientific and policy communities with a basin-wide and long-term measure of the ecological health of marine plankton. Established in 1931, the CPR Survey is the longest running, most geographically extensive marine ecological survey in the world. It has a considerable database of marine plankton and associated metadata that is used by researchers and policy makers to examine strategically important science pillars such as climate change, human health, fisheries, biodiversity, pathogens, invasive species, ocean acidification and natural capital.
DataBank is a repository that will keep data safe in the long term. It can automatically obtain a Digital Object Indicator (DOI) for each data package, and make the metadata and/or the underlying data searchable and accessible by the wider world.
Open Research Exeter (ORE) is the University of Exeter's repository for all types of research, including research papers, research data and theses. Research in ORE can be viewed and downloaded freely by anyone, anywhere: researchers, students, industry, business and the wider public. ORE's content includes journal articles, conference papers, working papers, reports, book chapters, videos, audio, images, multimedia research project outputs, raw data and analysed data. ORE's content is securely stored, managed and preserved to ensure free, permanent access.
The ADS is an accredited digital repository for heritage data that supports research, learning and teaching with freely available, high quality and dependable digital resources by preserving and disseminating digital data in the long term. The ADS also promotes good practice in the use of digital data, provides technical advice to the heritage community, and supports the deployment of digital technologies.
The University has followed all of the children born in Aberdeen in 1921, 1936, and 1950-1956 as they grow and age. Collectively these groups are known as the ABERDEEN BIRTH COHORTS, and are a jewel in the crown of Scottish health research and have helped to advance our understanding of aging well. The Children of the 1950s study is a population-based resource for the study of biological and social influences on health across the life-course and between generations.
The UK Data Archive is curator of the largest collection of digital data in the social sciences and humanities in the United Kingdom. With several thousand datasets relating to society, both historical and contemporary, our Archive is a vital resource for researchers, teachers and learners.We are an internationally acknowledged centre of expertise in the areas of acquiring, curating and providing access to data. Since 2005 our archive has been designated a Place of Deposit by the National Archives allowing us to curate public records. We acquire high quality data from the academic, public, and commercial sectors, providing continuous access to these data while we also support existing and emerging communities of data users.
VADS is the online resource for visual arts. It has provided services to the academic community for 12 years and has built up a considerable portfolio of visual art collections comprising over 100,000 images that are freely available and copyright cleared for use in learning, teaching and research in the UK. VADS provides: expert guidance and help for digital projects in art education; resource development and hosting for art education; project management and consultancy for art education; leadership in the innovative use of ICT in education through its research and development activities. VADS offers advice and guidance to the visual arts research, teaching and learning communities on all aspects of digital resource management from funding, through delivery and use, to preservation.
The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a long-standing mission to collect, organise and make available databases for biomolecular science. It makes available a collection of databases along with tools to search, download and analyse their content. These databases include DNA and protein sequences and structures, genome annotation, gene expression information, molecular interactions and pathways. Connected to these are linking and descriptive data resources such as protein motifs, ontologies and many others. In many of these efforts, the EBI is a European node in global data-sharing agreements involving, for example, the USA and Japan.
The Detection of Archaeological Residues using Remote-sensing Techniques (DART) project was initiated in 2010 in order to investigate the ability of various sensors to detect archaeological features in ‘difficult’ circumstances. Concluding in September 2013, DART had the overall aim of developing analytical methods for identifying and quantifying gradual changes and dynamics in sensor responses associated with surface and near-surface archaeological features under different environmental and land-management conditions.
MGnify (formerly: EBI Metagenomics) offers an automated pipeline for the analysis and archiving of microbiome data to help determine the taxonomic diversity and functional & metabolic potential of environmental samples. Users can submit their own data for analysis or freely browse all of the analysed public datasets held within the repository. In addition, users can request analysis of any appropriate dataset within the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA). User-submitted or ENA-derived datasets can also be assembled on request, prior to analysis.
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
The figshare service for the University of Sheffield allows researchers to store, share and publish research data. It helps the research data to be accessible by storing Metadata alongside datasets. Additionally, every uploaded item receives a Digital Object identifier (DOI), which allows the data to be citable and sustainable. If there are any ethical or copyright concerns about publishing a certain dataset, it is possible to publish the metadata associated with the dataset to help discoverability while sharing the data itself via a private channel through manual approval.
ForestPlots.net is a web-accessible secure repository for forest plot inventories in South America, Africa and Asia. The database includes plot geographical information; location, taxonomic information and diameter measurements of trees inside each plot; and participants in plot establishment and re-measurement, including principal investigators, field assistants, students.