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The US Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is the VO effort based in the US, and it is one of many VO projects currently underway worldwide. The primary emphasis of the VAO is to provide new scientific research capabilities to the astronomy community. Thus an essential component of the VAO activity is obtaining input from US astronomers about the research tools that are most urgently needed in their work, and this information will guide the development efforts of the VAO. >>>!!!<<< Funding discontinued in 2014 and all software, documentation, and other digital assets developed under the VAO are stored in the VAO Project Repository https://sites.google.com/site/usvirtualobservatory/ . Code is archived on Github https://github.com/TomMcGlynn/usvirtualobservatory . >>>!!!<<<
Launched in December 2013, Gaia is destined to create the most accurate map yet of the Milky Way. By making accurate measurements of the positions and motions of stars in the Milky Way, it will answer questions about the origin and evolution of our home galaxy. The first data release (2016) contains three-dimensional positions and two-dimensional motions of a subset of two million stars. The second data release (2018) increases that number to over 1.6 Billion. Gaia’s measurements are as precise as planned, paving the way to a better understanding of our galaxy and its neighborhood. The AIP hosts the Gaia data as one of the external data centers along with the main Gaia archive maintained by ESAC and provides access to the Gaia data releases as part of Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC).