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Found 22 result(s)
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CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
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China National GeneBank DataBase (CNGBdb) is a unified platform built for biological big data sharing and application services to the research community. Based on the big data and cloud computing technologies, it provides data services such as archive, analysis, knowledge search, management authorization, and visualization. At present, CNGBdb has integrated large amounts of internal and external molecular data and other information from CNGB, NCBI, EBI, DDBJ, etc., indexed by search, covering 12 data structures. Moreover, CNGBdb correlates living sources, biological samples and bioinformatic data to realize the traceability of comprehensive data.
Content type(s)
Since the first discovery of RNA pseudoknots more and many more pseudoknots have been found. However, not all of those pseudoknot data are easy to trace. Sometimes the information is hidden in a publication where the title gives no hint that pseudoknot information is there. This was the first reason that we thought that a general accessible information source for pseudoknots would be handy.
Synapse is an open source software platform that clinical and biological data scientists can use to carry out, track, and communicate their research in real time. Synapse enables co-location of scientific content (data, code, results) and narrative descriptions of that work.
IntEnz contains the recommendation of the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology on the nomenclature and classification of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Users can browse by enzyme classification or use advanced search options to search enzymes by class, subclass and sub-subclass information.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
Cryo electron microscopy enables the determination of 3D structures of macromolecular complexes and cells from 2 to 100 Å resolution. EMDataResource is the unified global portal for one-stop deposition and retrieval of 3DEM density maps, atomic models and associated metadata, and is a joint effort among investigators of the Stanford/SLAC CryoEM Facility and the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) at Rutgers, in collaboration with the EMDB team at the European Bioinformatics Institute. EMDataResource also serves as a resource for news, events, software tools, data standards, and validation methods for the 3DEM community. The major goal of the EMDataResource project in the current funding period is to work with the 3DEM community to (1) establish data-validation methods that can be used in the process of structure determination, (2) define the key indicators of a well-determined structure that should accompany every deposition, and (3) implement appropriate validation procedures for maps and map-derived models into a 3DEM validation pipeline.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
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CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
MetaCyc is a curated database of experimentally elucidated metabolic pathways from all domains of life. MetaCyc contains pathways involved in both primary and secondary metabolism, as well as associated metabolites, reactions, enzymes, and genes. The goal of MetaCyc is to catalog the universe of metabolism by storing a representative sample of each experimentally elucidated pathway. MetaCyc applications include: Online encyclopedia of metabolism, Prediction of metabolic pathways in sequenced genomes, Support metabolic engineering via enzyme database, Metabolite database aids. metabolomics research.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
The mission of the Influenza Research Database (IRD) is to provide a resource for the influenza virus research community that will facilitate an understanding of the influenza virus and how it interacts with the host organism, leading to new treatments and preventive actions. This resource will contain avian and non-human mammalian influenza surveillance data, human clinical data associated with virus extracts, phenotypic characteristics of viruses isolated from extracts, and all genomic and proteomic data available in public repositories for influenza viruses.
MetaboLights is a database for Metabolomics experiments and derived information. The database is cross-species, cross-technique and covers metabolite structures and their reference spectra as well as their biological roles, locations and concentrations, and experimental data from metabolic experiments.
ChEMBL is a database of bioactive drug-like small molecules, it contains 2-D structures, calculated properties (e.g. logP, Molecular Weight, Lipinski Parameters, etc.) and abstracted bioactivities (e.g. binding constants, pharmacology and ADMET data). The data is abstracted and curated from the primary scientific literature, and cover a significant fraction of the SAR and discovery of modern drugs We attempt to normalise the bioactivities into a uniform set of end-points and units where possible, and also to tag the links between a molecular target and a published assay with a set of varying confidence levels. Additional data on clinical progress of compounds is being integrated into ChEMBL at the current time.