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RADAR service offers the ability to search for research data descriptions of the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke). The service includes descriptions of research data for agriculture, forestry and food sectors, game management, fisheries and environment. The public web service aims to facilitate discovering subjects of natural resources studies. In addition to Luke's research data descriptions one can search metadata of the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). The interface between Luke and SYKE metadata services combines Luke's research data descriptions and SYKE's descriptions of spatial datasets and data systems into a unified search service.
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In the Hellenistic and Roman period, many buildings and material objects were constructed using structural geometrical specifications. Ancient sundials were built using basic geometrical forms of very few construction types taking also into account the astronomical dimensions. In architectural drawings, comparable proportions can be found. The tower of the winds merges all these geometrical principles of construction. The construction drawings of this collection comprise geometrical drafts used for the construction of buildings. They differ from simple geometrical forms in that they present the general layout of the lines indicating objects and geometrical areas. Their geometrical dimensions are constructed according to the principles of proportional relations and were implemented in – sometimes very complex – work processes in which artefacts of the original objects were constructed. Construction drawings from the pillars of Didyma, which were discovered by Lothar Haselberger, serve as a paradigmatic model for these architectural drawings.