Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 14 result(s)
The USGS currently houses the institute at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. The LCI will address land cover topics from local to global scales, and in both domestic and international settings. The USGS through the Land Cover Institute serves as a facilitator for land cover and land use science, applications, and production functions. The institute assists in the availability and technical support of land cover data sets through increasing public and scientific awareness of the importance of land cover science. LCI continues, after the reorganization of the World Data Centers in 2009, serving as the World Data Center (WDC) for land cover data for access to, or information about, land cover data of the world
PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts – which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking – now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses. PAGER uses these earthquake parameters to calculate estimates of ground shaking by using the methodology and software developed for ShakeMaps. ShakeMap sites provide near-real-time maps of ground motion and shaking intensity following significant earthquakes. These maps are used by federal, state, and local organizations, both public and private, for post-earthquake response and recovery, public and scientific information, as well as for preparedness exercises and disaster planning.
The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research collaboration that explores Earth's history and dynamics using ocean-going research platforms to recover data recorded in seafloor sediments and rocks and to monitor subseafloor environments. IODP depends on facilities funded by three platform providers with financial contributions from five additional partner agencies. Together, these entities represent 26 nations whose scientists are selected to staff IODP research expeditions conducted throughout the world's oceans. IODP expeditions are developed from hypothesis-driven science proposals aligned with the program's science plan Illuminating Earth's Past, Present, and Future. The science plan identifies 14 challenge questions in the four areas of climate change, deep life, planetary dynamics, and geohazards. Until 2013 under the name: International Ocean Drilling Program.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
MorphoBank is a web application with tools and archives for evolutionary research, specifically systematics (the science of determining the evolutionary relationships among species). Study of the phenotype, which is often visually-based, is central to contemporary systematics and taxonomic research. MorphoBank was developed specifically to provide much needed tools for the expansion and modernization of phylogenetic work on the phenotype
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.
The DCS allows you to search a catalogue of metadata (information describing data) to discover and gain access to NERC's data holdings and information products. The metadata are prepared to a common NERC Metadata Standard and are provided to the catalogue by the NERC Data Centres.
Country
The geophysical database, GERDA, is a strong tool for data storage, handling and QC. Data are uploaded to and downloaded from the GERDA database through this website. GERDA is the Danish national database on shallow geophysical data. Since its establishment in 1998-2000, the database has been continuously developed. The database is hosted by the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS).
Fossilworks is a web-based portal to the Paleobiology Database. Fossilworks is the original public interface to the PaleoDB and is housed at Macquarie. It is a non-governmental, non-profit public resource. Its purpose is to provide global, collection-based occurrence and taxonomic data for marine and terrestrial animals and plants of any geological age, as well as web-based software for statistical analysis of the data. The project's wider, long-term goal is to encourage collaborative efforts to answer large-scale paleobiological questions by developing a useful database infrastructure and bringing together large data sets.
DLESE is the Digital Library for Earth System Education, a geoscience community resource that supports teaching and learning about the Earth system. It is funded by the National Science Foundation and is being built by a community of educators, students, and scientists to support Earth system education at all levels and in both formal and informal settings. Resources in DLESE include lesson plans, scientific data, visualizations, interactive computer models, and virtual field trips - in short, any web-accessible teaching or learning material. Many of these resources are organized in collections, or groups of related resources that reflect a coherent, focused theme. In many ways, digital collections are analogous to collections in traditional bricks-and-mortar libraries.
EIDA, an initiative within ORFEUS, is a distributed data centre established to (a) securely archive seismic waveform data and related metadata, gathered by European research infrastructures, and (b) provide transparent access to the archives by the geosciences research communities. EIDA nodes are data centres which collect and archive data from seismic networks deploying broad-band sensors, short period sensors, accelerometers, infrasound sensors and other geophysical instruments. Networks contributing data to EIDA are listed in the ORFEUS EIDA networklist (http://www.orfeus-eu.org/data/eida/networks/). Data from the ORFEUS Data Center (ODC), hosted by KNMI, are available through EIDA. Technically, EIDA is based on an underlying architecture developed by GFZ to provide transparent access to all nodes' data. Data within the distributed archives are accessible via the ArcLink protocol (http://www.seiscomp3.org/wiki/doc/applications/arclink).
Country
Since 2003, data concerning material, slides and taxa, existing within the Friedrich Hustedt Diatom centre, are being entered in a database. In 2014, all data from the initial collection database have been transferred into a new system using the EarthCape platform. The web interface of this new system is now on-line but is incomplete. The database stores information on all specimens in the collection, named by Hustedt or deposited later by other workers, with the literature-, material- and slide-information. Taxon names have been entered as they appear on the slides or on a sheet in a slidebox, although in some cases, recently proposed names are given under “comments”. The database also has a complete entry of all of the publications held in the library of the centre, now more than 8,000.
The Greenland Climate Network provides year-round data on the climate of Greenland's ice sheet. These data are available to researchers by request through the Greenland Climate Network Data Request Web page. Users may also download data from Humboldt and TUNU-N sites from their FTP Server-ftp://seaice.colorado.edu/pub/parca/.
A new global data compilation consisting of 35,523 terrestrial data points and 23,013 marine data points may be downloaded in Excel csv format. This compilation does not contain the descriptive codes relating to metadata that were included in the previous compilations. Users are advised to consult the references and make their own interpretations as to the quality of the data. Previous compilations of the data were provided by Lee and Uyeda (1965), Simmons and Horai (1968), Jessop, Hobart, and Sclater (1975), and Pollack, Hurter, and Johnson, 1993.