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Found 7 result(s)
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Human biomaterial banks (short: biobanks) are collections of human body substances (i.e. blood, DNA, urine or tissue) connected with disease specific information. This allow for research of relations between deseases and underlying (molecular) modifications and paves the way for developing target-oriented therapies ("personalized medicine"). The biobank material arises from samples taken for therapeutical or diagnostic reasons or is extracted in the context of clinical trials. An approval for usage by the patient is always needed prior to any research activities.
ALSPAC is a longitudinal birth cohort study which enrolled pregnant women who were resident in one of three Bristol-based health districts in the former County of Avon with an expected delivery date between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992. Around 14,000 pregnant women were initially recruited. Detailed information has been collected on these women, their partners and subsequent children using self-completion questionnaires, data extraction from medical notes, linkage to routine information systems and from hands-on research clinics. Additional cohorts of participants have since been enrolled in their own right including fathers, siblings, children of the children and grandparents of the children. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ALSPAC Ethics and Law Committee (IRB00003312) and Local Research Ethics.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
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WHIP is a database of individual work histories, based on Inps administrative archives. The reference population is made up by all the people – Italian and foreign – who have worked in Italy even only for only a part of their working career. A large representative sample has been extracted from this population: in the standard file the sampling coefficient is about 1: 180, for a dynamic population of about 370,000 people (figures will be doubled in the full edition). For each of these people the main episodes of their working careers are observed. The complete list of observations includes: private employee working contracts, atypical contracts, self-employment activities as artisan, trader and some activities as freelancer, retirement spells, as well as non-working spells in which the individual received social benefits, like unemployment subsidies or mobility benefits. The workers for whom activity is not observed in WHIP are those who worked in the public sector or as freelancers (lawyers or notaries) – who have an autonomous security fund. The WHIP section concerning employee contracts is a Linked Employer Employee Database: in addition to the data about the contract, thanks to a linkage with the Inps Firm Observatory, data concerning the firm in which the worker is employed is also available.
Country
EMS is the BC Ministry of Environment's primary monitoring data repository. The system was designed to capture data covering physical/chemical and biological analyses performed on water, air, solid waste discharges and ambient monitoring sites throughout the province. It also contains related quality assurance data. Samples are collected by either ministry staff or permittees under the Environmental Management Act and then analyzed in public or private sector laboratories. The majority of such monitoring data is entered into EMS electronically via Electronic Data Transfer (EDT). EMS data is typically available in formatted hard copy reports or electronically in comma delimited (e.g., .csv) files as: Monitoring location-related data, Sample and results-related data. Direct access to EMS is restricted to ministry staff, however public access is available upon request through EMS Web Reporting (http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/emswr/).
The National Trauma Data Bank® (NTDB) is the largest aggregation of trauma registry data ever assembled. The goal of the NTDB is to inform the medical community, the public, and decision makers about a wide variety of issues that characterize the current state of care for injured persons. Registry data that is collected from the NTDB is compiled annually and disseminated in the forms of hospital benchmark reports, data quality reports, and research data sets. Research data sets that can be used by researchers. To gain access to NTDB data, researchers must submit requests through our online application process
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NAKALA allows research teams, who so request, to file their digital data (text files, sound, image, video) in a secure warehouse, which ensures both data availability and quotability time. NAKALA is a repository for humanities and social sciences. It's powered in France by Huma-Num, the french infrastructure for digital humanities.