Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
  • 1 (current)
Found 17 result(s)
Country
Human biomaterial banks (short: biobanks) are collections of human body substances (i.e. blood, DNA, urine or tissue) connected with disease specific information. This allow for research of relations between deseases and underlying (molecular) modifications and paves the way for developing target-oriented therapies ("personalized medicine"). The biobank material arises from samples taken for therapeutical or diagnostic reasons or is extracted in the context of clinical trials. An approval for usage by the patient is always needed prior to any research activities.
Country
<<<<!! The database is no longer available from 1st July 2018!! CRYSTMET was previously included in the NCDS as part of CrystalWorks. Unfortunately we are no longer able to license the CRYSTMET database for access through the NCDS. Therefore the database will no longer be accessible from 1st July 2018. >>>> CRYSTMET contains chemical, crystallographic and bibliographic data together with associated comments regarding experimental details for each study. It is a database of critically evaluated crystallographic data for metals, including alloys, intermetallics and minerals.Using these data, a number of associated files are derived, a major one being a parallel file of calculated powder patterns. These derived data are included within the CRYSTMET product.
ALSPAC is a longitudinal birth cohort study which enrolled pregnant women who were resident in one of three Bristol-based health districts in the former County of Avon with an expected delivery date between 1st April 1991 and 31st December 1992. Around 14,000 pregnant women were initially recruited. Detailed information has been collected on these women, their partners and subsequent children using self-completion questionnaires, data extraction from medical notes, linkage to routine information systems and from hands-on research clinics. Additional cohorts of participants have since been enrolled in their own right including fathers, siblings, children of the children and grandparents of the children. Ethical approval for the study was obtained from the ALSPAC Ethics and Law Committee (IRB00003312) and Local Research Ethics.
The most comprehensive database on fully determined inorganic crystal structures • Full structural data: cell parameters, atom positions for all entries, displacement parameters • Full bibliographic data: publication title, journal reference(s), author names • Full structure description: Structural formula, compositions, ANX formulae, structure types • High-quality data: extensive data evaluation and correction by senior experts • Web and PC based software solutions, data updated twice a year • 25+ years of serving the scientific community
Country
eKlima is a web site to access the database of climate data of the Norwegian Meteorological Institute from an external computer. The database contains measurements made by the Norwegian Meteorological Institute and its collaborators as far back in time as 1957. There are also some data that are older than that, with the longest data sets going as far back in time as 150 years. However, for the period before 1957 not all measurements are completely digitised yet.
Country
One of the world’s largest banks of biological, psychosocial and clinical data on people suffering from mental health problems. The Signature center systematically collects biological, psychosocial and clinical indicators from patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency and at four points throughout their journey in the hospital: upon arrival to the emergency room (state of crisis), at the end of their hospital stay, as well as at the beginning and the end of outpatient treatment. For all hospital clients who agree to participate, blood specimens are collected for the purpose of measuring metabolic, genetic, toxic and infectious biomarkers, while saliva samples are collected to measure sex hormones and hair samples are collected to measure stress hormones. Questionnaire has been selected to cover important dimensional aspects of mental illness such as Behaviour and Cognition (Psychosis, Depression, Anxiety, Impulsiveness, Aggression, Suicide, Addiction, Sleep),Socio-demographic Profile (Spiritual beliefs, Social functioning, Childhood experiences, Demographic, Family background) and Medical Data (Medication, Diagnosis, Long-term health, RAMQ data). On 2016, May there are more than 1150 participants and 400 for the longitudinal Follow-Up
Content type(s)
Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
Country
WHIP is a database of individual work histories, based on Inps administrative archives. The reference population is made up by all the people – Italian and foreign – who have worked in Italy even only for only a part of their working career. A large representative sample has been extracted from this population: in the standard file the sampling coefficient is about 1: 180, for a dynamic population of about 370,000 people (figures will be doubled in the full edition). For each of these people the main episodes of their working careers are observed. The complete list of observations includes: private employee working contracts, atypical contracts, self-employment activities as artisan, trader and some activities as freelancer, retirement spells, as well as non-working spells in which the individual received social benefits, like unemployment subsidies or mobility benefits. The workers for whom activity is not observed in WHIP are those who worked in the public sector or as freelancers (lawyers or notaries) – who have an autonomous security fund. The WHIP section concerning employee contracts is a Linked Employer Employee Database: in addition to the data about the contract, thanks to a linkage with the Inps Firm Observatory, data concerning the firm in which the worker is employed is also available.
This unique resource covers the entire field of astronomy and astrophysics and this online version includes the full text of over 2,750 articles, plus sophisticated search and retrieval functionality, links to the primary literature, and is frequently updated with new material. An active editorial team, headed by the Encyclopedia's editor-in-chief, Paul Murdin, oversees the continual commissioning, reviewing and loading of new and revised content.In a unique collaboration, Nature Publishing Group and Institute of Physics Publishing published the most extensive and comprehensive reference work in astronomy and astrophysics in both print and online formats. First published as a four volume print edition in 2001, the initial Web version went live in 2002, and contained the original print material and was rapidly supplemented with numerous updates and newly commissioned material. Since July 2006 the Encyclopedia is published solely by Taylor & Francis.
Country
EMS is the BC Ministry of Environment's primary monitoring data repository. The system was designed to capture data covering physical/chemical and biological analyses performed on water, air, solid waste discharges and ambient monitoring sites throughout the province. It also contains related quality assurance data. Samples are collected by either ministry staff or permittees under the Environmental Management Act and then analyzed in public or private sector laboratories. The majority of such monitoring data is entered into EMS electronically via Electronic Data Transfer (EDT). EMS data is typically available in formatted hard copy reports or electronically in comma delimited (e.g., .csv) files as: Monitoring location-related data, Sample and results-related data. Direct access to EMS is restricted to ministry staff, however public access is available upon request through EMS Web Reporting (http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/emswr/).
Country
The Queen's Research Data Centre is a member of the Canadian Research Data Centre Network (CRDCN) that provides researchers with access to microdata 'masterfiles' from population and health surveys. Access to the RDC is limited to those with projects approved by Statistics Canada. Before applying to an RDC, you will have to show that your research cannot be conducted using Public Use Microdata Files (PUMFs) available through the Data Liberation Initiative (DLI). Access to DLI PUMFS at Queen's is available through the Social Science Data Centre, using the ODESI data portal.
The USDA Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Cotton Program maintains a National Database (NDB) in Memphis, Tennessee for owner access to cotton classification data. The NDB is computerized telecommunications system which allows owners or authorized agents of owners to retrieve classing data from the current crop and/or the previous four crops. The NDB stores classing information from all 10 regional classing offices.
The National Trauma Data Bank® (NTDB) is the largest aggregation of trauma registry data ever assembled. The goal of the NTDB is to inform the medical community, the public, and decision makers about a wide variety of issues that characterize the current state of care for injured persons. Registry data that is collected from the NTDB is compiled annually and disseminated in the forms of hospital benchmark reports, data quality reports, and research data sets. Research data sets that can be used by researchers. To gain access to NTDB data, researchers must submit requests through our online application process
Country
NAKALA allows research teams, who so request, to file their digital data (text files, sound, image, video) in a secure warehouse, which ensures both data availability and quotability time. NAKALA is a repository for humanities and social sciences. It's powered in France by Huma-Num, the french infrastructure for digital humanities.