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Found 28 result(s)
EMPIAR, the Electron Microscopy Public Image Archive, is a public resource for raw, 2D electron microscopy images. Here, you can browse, upload, download and reprocess the thousands of raw, 2D images used to build a 3D structure. The purpose of EMPIAR is to provide an easy access to the state-of-the-art raw data to facilitate methods development and validation, which will lead to better 3D structures. It complements the Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB), where 3D images are stored, and uses the fault-tolerant Aspera platform for data transfers
The DIP database catalogs experimentally determined interactions between proteins. It combines information from a variety of sources to create a single, consistent set of protein-protein interactions. The data stored within the DIP database were curated, both, manually by expert curators and also automatically using computational approaches that utilize the the knowledge about the protein-protein interaction networks extracted from the most reliable, core subset of the DIP data. Please, check the reference page to find articles describing the DIP database in greater detail. The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
Born in Bradford is one of the biggest and most important medical research studies undertaken in the UK. The project started in 2007 and is looking to answer questions about our health by tracking the lives of 13,500 babies and their families and will provide information for studies across the UK and around the world. The aim of Born in Bradford is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness by studying children from all cultures and backgrounds as their lives unfold.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
The European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) captures and presents information relating to experimental workflows that are based around nucleotide sequencing. A typical workflow includes the isolation and preparation of material for sequencing, a run of a sequencing machine in which sequencing data are produced and a subsequent bioinformatic analysis pipeline. ENA records this information in a data model that covers input information (sample, experimental setup, machine configuration), output machine data (sequence traces, reads and quality scores) and interpreted information (assembly, mapping, functional annotation). Data arrive at ENA from a variety of sources. These include submissions of raw data, assembled sequences and annotation from small-scale sequencing efforts, data provision from the major European sequencing centres and routine and comprehensive exchange with our partners in the International Nucleotide Sequence Database Collaboration (INSDC). Provision of nucleotide sequence data to ENA or its INSDC partners has become a central and mandatory step in the dissemination of research findings to the scientific community. ENA works with publishers of scientific literature and funding bodies to ensure compliance with these principles and to provide optimal submission systems and data access tools that work seamlessly with the published literature.
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
GenBank® is a comprehensive database that contains publicly available nucleotide sequences for almost 260 000 formally described species. These sequences are obtained primarily through submissions from individual laboratories and batch submissions from large-scale sequencing projects, including whole-genome shotgun (WGS) and environmental sampling projects. Most submissions are made using the web-based BankIt or standalone Sequin programs, and GenBank staff assigns accession numbers upon data receipt. Daily data exchange with the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) and the DNA Data Bank of Japan (DDBJ) ensures worldwide coverage. GenBank is accessible through the NCBI Entrez retrieval system, which integrates data from the major DNA and protein sequence databases along with taxonomy, genome, mapping, protein structure and domain information, and the biomedical journal literature via PubMed. BLAST provides sequence similarity searches of GenBank and other sequence databases. Complete bimonthly releases and daily updates of the GenBank database are available by FTP.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
PDBe is the European resource for the collection, organisation and dissemination of data on biological macromolecular structures. In collaboration with the other worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) partners - the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics (RCSB) and BioMagResBank (BMRB) in the USA and the Protein Data Bank of Japan (PDBj) - we work to collate, maintain and provide access to the global repository of macromolecular structure data. We develop tools, services and resources to make structure-related data more accessible to the biomedical community.