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Found 23 result(s)
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The Canadian Opinion Research Archive at Queen's University makes available commercial and independent surveys to the academic, research and journalistic communities. Founded in 1992, CORA contains hundreds of surveys including thousands of discrete items collected by major commercial Canadian firms dating back to the 1970s. CORA is continually adding new surveys and is always soliciting new data from commercial research firms, independent think tanks, research institutes, NGOs, and academic researchers. This website also includes readily accessible results from these surveys, tracking Canadian opinion over time on frequently asked survey questions, as well as tabular results from recent Canadian surveys, and more general information on polling. This material is made available as a public service by CORA and its partners.
Originally established in 1989 at the University of Essex to house the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), ISER has grown into a leading centre for the production and analysis of longitudinal studies. It encompasses the ESRC Research Centre on Micro-Social Change and the successor to the BHPS, Understanding Society. As well as providing unrivalled postgraduate study opportunities, ISER also houses an internationally-renowned Microsimulation Unit which develops and runs the tax and benefit model, EUROMOD.
The NCAA Student-Athlete Experiences Data Archive provides access to data about student athletes and will grow to include a handful of user-friendly data collections related to graduation rates; team-level Academic Progress Rates in Division I; and individual-level data on the experiences of current and former student-athletes from the NCAA's Growth, Opportunities, Aspirations and Learning of Students in college study (GOALS), and the Study of College Outcomes and Recent Experiences (SCORE). In the long run, the NCAA expects to follow this initial release with the publication of as much data as possible from its archives. The data is used by college presidents, athletic personnel, faculty, student-athlete groups, media members, and researchers in looking at issues related to intercollegiate athletics and higher education.
MTSA is a Metropolitan Travel Survey Archive to store, preserve, and make publicly available, via the internet, travel surveys conducted by metropolitan areas, states and localities. As a result of cooperation from several agencies, we now have been able to post databases along with relevant documentation for many regions in the archive http://www.surveyarchive.org/archive.html . The databases and the documentation can be obtained from this website. In addition to making these databases publicly available, we are also in the process of converting all the databases to a common format to enhance the readability and usability of each survey, so many surveys can be used online, see analyze http://www.surveyarchive.org/analyze.html. The results from the first year of the project, along with issues related to archiving travel survey data are provided in our reports page http://www.surveyarchive.org/reports.html . Papers written by Yacov Zahavi, an instrumental figure in the development of travel surveys, are also provided here.
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Exposures in the period from conception to early childhood - including fetal growth, cell division, and organ functioning - may have long-lasting impact on health and disease susceptibility. To investigate these issues the Danish National Birth Cohort (Better health in generations) was established. A large cohort of pregnant women with long-term follow-up of the offspring was the obvious choice because many of the exposures of interest cannot be reconstructed with suffcient validity back in time. The study needed to be large, and the aim was to recruit 100,000 women early in pregnancy, and to continue follow-up for decades. Exposure information was collected by computer-assisted telephone interviews with the women twice during pregnancy and when their children were six and 18 months old. Participants were also asked to fill in a self-administered food frequency questionnaire in mid-pregnancy. Furthermore, a biological bank has been set up with blood taken from the mother twice during pregnancy and blood from theumbilical cord taken shortly after birth.
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The German Socio-Economic Panel Study (SOEP) is a wide-ranging representative longitudinal study of private households, located at the German Institute for Economic Research, DIW Berlin. Every year, there were nearly 11,000 households, and more than 20,000 persons sampled by the fieldwork organization TNS Infratest Sozialforschung. The data provide information on all household members, consisting of Germans living in the Old and New German States, Foreigners, and recent Immigrants to Germany. The Panel was started in 1984. Some of the many topics include household composition, occupational biographies, employment, earnings, health and satisfaction indicators.
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AUSSDA - The Austrian Social Science Data Archive (AUSSDA) is a core social science research infrastructure in Austria, offering research data and archiving services. It is located at the Universities of Vienna, Graz, and Linz and is funded by the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Science and Research (BMBWF). AUSSDA strives to become the leading research infrastructure for the social sciences in Austria, offering high quality, sustainable, and easy-to-use solutions for archiving digital data, along with world-wide access to it. The archive follows international standards in order to make deposited social science data and documentation findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable. AUSSDA is active in a growing network of national and international partners, promoting high archiving standards and contributing to archive solutions of the future. Our collection covers all social science data. We support the open data movement and work towards maximizing the potential for data use within our user group. The primary beneficiaries of our services are researchers, while our online services can also be used by students, educational institutions as well as media representatives and the public. We stand for integrity in data archiving and promote ethical research principles.
The Health and Retirement Study (HRS) is a longitudinal panel study that surveys a representative sample of more than 26,000 Americans over the age of 50 every two years. The study has collected information about income, work, assets, pension plans, health insurance, disability, physical health and functioning, cognitive functioning, genetic information and health care expenditures.
CPES provides access to information that relates to mental disorders among the general population. Its primary goal is to collect data about the prevalence of mental disorders and their treatments in adult populations in the United States. It also allows for research related to cultural and ethnic influences on mental health. CPES combines the data collected in three different nationally representative surveys (National Comorbidity Survey Replication, National Survey of American Life, National Latino and Asian American Study).
ScholarsArchive@OSU is Oregon State University's digital service for gathering, indexing, making available and storing the scholarly work of the Oregon State University community. It also includes materials from outside the institution in support of the university's land, sun, sea and space grant missions and other research interests.
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The Radio Telescope Data Center (RTDC) reduces, archives, and makes available on its web site data from SMA and the CfA Millimeter-wave Telescope. The whole-Galaxy CO survey presented in Dame et al. (2001) is a composite of 37 separate surveys. The data from most of these surveys can be accessed. Larger composites of these surveys are available separately.
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The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.
The Integrated Fertility Survey Series (IFSS) is a project of the Population Studies aiming in view to produce a harmonized dataset of U.S. family and fertility surveys spanning five decades (1955-2002). IFSS integrates data from ten underlying component studies of family and fertility encompassing the Growth of American Families (GAF) in 1955 and 1960; National Fertility Surveys (NFS) in 1965 and 1970; as well as National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG) in 1973, 1976, 1982, 1988, 1995, and 2002. The first release contains harmonized sociodemographic variables for all respondents from all ten component studies, including those related to marital status, race and ethnicity, etc. Thus it provides access to researchers, educators, students, policy makers, and others with a data resource to examine issues related to families and fertility in the United States. Potential users can download original/ harmonized datasets (along with documentation) and numerous analytic tools make it possible to quickly and easily explore the data and obtain information about changes in behaviors and attitudes across time.
The LISS panel (Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social sciences) is the principal component of the MESS project. It consists of 4500 households, comprising 7000 individuals. The panel is based on a true probability sample of households drawn from the population register by Statistics Netherlands. Households that could not otherwise participate are provided with a computer and Internet connection. A special immigrant panel is available in addition to the LISS panel. This immigrant panel is comprised of around 1600 households (2400 individuals) of which 1100 households (1700 individuals) are of non-Dutch origin. Panel members complete online questionnaires every month of about 15 to 30 minutes in total. They are paid for each completed questionnaire. One member in the household provides the household data and updates this information at regular time intervals.
The UCD Digital Library is a platform for exploring cultural heritage, engaging with digital scholarship, and accessing research data. The UCD Digital Library allows you to search, browse and explore a growing collection of historical materials, photographs, art, interviews, letters, and other exciting content, that have been digitised and made freely available.
The General Social Survey (GSS) conducts basic scientific research on the structure and development of American society with a data-collection program designed to both monitor societal change within the United States and to compare the United States to other nations.
!!! The documents are stored in the ETH Web archive and are no longer maintained !!! The ETHTDA archives and documents the data set collected by the IVT, ETH Zürich in the course of its research. The majority of the about 40 surveys are designed and conducted by its staff. Some further data sets are included after careful cleaning and further documentation.
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The Irish Social Science Data Archive (ISSDA) is Ireland’s leading centre for quantitative data acquisition, preservation, and dissemination. Its mission is to ensure wide access to quantitative datasets in the social sciences, and to advance the promotion of international comparative studies of the Irish economy and Irish society.
The Whitehall II study was established to explore the relationship between socio-economic status, stress and cardiovascular disease. A cohort of 10,308 participants aged 35-55, of whom 3,413 were women and 6,895 men, was recruited from the British Civil Service in 1985. Since this first wave of data collection, self-completion questionnaires and clinical data have been collected from the cohort every two to five years with a high level of participation. Data collection is intended to continue until 2030.
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The Duanaire project borrows the Irish word for song-book or anthology (loosely, a 'treasury'), to convey the sense of a rich, varied corpus handed down and explored anew. This project, led by Dr Aidan Kane (economics at NUI Galway), will open up a wealth of Irish economic history data, and in particular, Irish fiscal history data, by making accessible online a range of datasets in flexible forms to diverse audiences. The project is constructing a unique infrastructure for the imaginative curation, exploration, and sharing of significant tranches of Irish economic history data.
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The European Election and Referendum Database is specifically intended to provide election results on a regional level for European countries. The archive cover the period from 1990 until present and publishes results from parliamentary elections, European Parliament elections, presidential elections, as well as EU-related referendums for a total of 35 European countries.
The Mindboggle-101 data consist of three data sets: (1) individually labeled human brain surfaces and volumes, (2) templates (unlabeled images combining the individual brains, used for registration), and (3) atlases (anatomical labels combining the individual brains, used for labeling).