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Found 42 result(s)
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles, conference proceedings and research data made open access.
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Research Data Centres offer a secure access to detailed microdata from Statistics Canada's surveys, and to Canadian censuses' data, as well as to an increasing number of administrative data sets. The search engine was designed to help you find out more easily which dataset among all the surveys available in the RDCs best suits your research needs.
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The UNAM opens the door to share millions of open data for the benefit of education and research. With this portal (www.datosabiertos.unam.mx) the university shares records of digital collections, academic research projects, repositories and publications to generate new knowledge. This way, it works as an online access point to search university collections authorized for their use, reuse and free redistribution by anyone, without copyright restrictions, patents or other control mechanisms, as long as the Terms of Free Use for UNAM Open Data are respected. The UNAM Open Data Portal contains data, digital objects and geospatial layers of biological collections, artistic work, music, veterinary medicine, university projects, among others. It allows databases to be consulted and downloaded in open and structured formats. One of the most outstanding collections is the National Herbarium of Mexico (MEXU), with almost two million records and high resolution images of plants around the world, mainly collected in Mexico. MEXU is the largest herbarium in the country and in Latin America; it’s among one of the ten most active herbariums in the world.
The Brown Digital Repository (BDR) is a place to gather, index, store, preserve, and make available digital assets produced via the scholarly, instructional, research, and administrative activities at Brown.
Public Opinion in the European Union. Our surveys address major topics concerning European citizenship. The Standard Eurobarometer was established in 1973. Since 1973, the European Commission has been monitoring the evolution of public opinion in the Member States, thus helping the preparation of texts, decision-making and the evaluation of its work. Our surveys and studies address major topics concerning European citizenship: enlargement, social situation, health, culture, information technology, environment, the Euro, defence, etc. Each survey consists of approximately 1000 face-to-face interviews per country. Reports are published twice yearly. Reproduction is authorised, except for commercial purposes, provided the source is acknowledged. Special Eurobarometer reports are based on in-depth thematic studies carried out for various services of the European Commission or other EU Institutions and integrated in the Standard Eurobarometer's polling waves. Reproduction is authorised, except for commercial purposes, provided the source is acknowledged. Flash Eurobarometers are ad hoc thematic telephone interviews conducted at the request of any service of the European Commission. Flash surveys enable the Commission to obtain results relatively quickly and to focus on specific target groups, as and when required. Reproduction is authorised, except for commercial purposes, provided the source is acknowledged. The qualitative studies investigate in-depth the motivations, feelings and reactions of selected social groups towards a given subject or concept, by listening to and analysing their way of expressing themselves in discussion groups or with non-directive interviews.
The Johns Hopkins Data Archive contains data collections produced by the Johns Hopkins community of researchers for public access and use. Each dataset has a citation and DOI, facilitating attribution and connection to research publications. If you are conducting research at Johns Hopkins and are interested in archiving your data with the JHU Data Archive, please contact us to discuss your research and data access needs. Currently, the JHU Data Archive operates on the Dataverse repository software platform. More information about the benefits of archiving data and the JHU Data Archive can be found here: http://dms.data.jhu.edu/archiving-2/
The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
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In addition to the common documentation methods of cylinder seals by rolled impression and photography, this collection also offers 3D-models and digital impressions. The 3D-scans can be performed without impacting the objects, thus reducing the risks. This method allows even the most fragile of seals to be documented, including those too delicate to be used for a rolled impression. These scans offer a true-to-scale reproduction of the seals.
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One of the world’s largest banks of biological, psychosocial and clinical data on people suffering from mental health problems. The Signature center systematically collects biological, psychosocial and clinical indicators from patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency and at four points throughout their journey in the hospital: upon arrival to the emergency room (state of crisis), at the end of their hospital stay, as well as at the beginning and the end of outpatient treatment. For all hospital clients who agree to participate, blood specimens are collected for the purpose of measuring metabolic, genetic, toxic and infectious biomarkers, while saliva samples are collected to measure sex hormones and hair samples are collected to measure stress hormones. Questionnaire has been selected to cover important dimensional aspects of mental illness such as Behaviour and Cognition (Psychosis, Depression, Anxiety, Impulsiveness, Aggression, Suicide, Addiction, Sleep),Socio-demographic Profile (Spiritual beliefs, Social functioning, Childhood experiences, Demographic, Family background) and Medical Data (Medication, Diagnosis, Long-term health, RAMQ data). On 2016, May there are more than 1150 participants and 400 for the longitudinal Follow-Up
CODEX is a database of NGS mouse and human experiments. Although, the main focus of CODEX is Haematopoiesis and Embryonic systems, the database includes a large variety of cell types. In addition to the publically available data, CODEX also includes a private site hosting non-published data. CODEX provides access to processed and curated NGS experiments. To use CODEX: (i) select a specialized repository (HAEMCODE or ESCODE) or choose the whole compendium (CODEX), then (ii) filter by organism and (iii) choose how to explore the database.
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Kinsources is an open and interactive platform to archive, share, analyze and compare kinship data used in scientific research. Kinsources is not just another genealogy website, but a peer-reviewed repository designed for comparative and collaborative research. The aim of Kinsources is to provide kinship studies with a large and solid empirical base. Kinsources combines the functionality of communal data repository with a toolbox providing researchers with advanced software for analyzing kinship data. The software Puck (Program for the Use and Computation of Kinship data) is integrated in the statistical package and the search engine of the Kinsources website. Kinsources is part of a research perspective that seeks to understand the interaction between genealogy, terminology and space in the emergence of kinship structures. Hosted by the TGIR HumaNum, the platform ensures both security and free access to the scientific data is validated by the research community.
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
The Humanitarian Data Exchange (HDX) is an open platform for sharing data across crises and organisations. Launched in July 2014, the goal of HDX is to make humanitarian data easy to find and use for analysis. HDX is managed by OCHA's Centre for Humanitarian Data, which is located in The Hague. OCHA is part of the United Nations Secretariat and is responsible for bringing together humanitarian actors to ensure a coherent response to emergencies. The HDX team includes OCHA staff and a number of consultants who are based in North America, Europe and Africa.
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Built on the Islandora digital repository framework, the UPEI hosted Published and Archived Data (data.upei.ca) service provides researchers with a place to securely publish or archive their research datasets.
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RELMIN collects, studies and publishes legal texts defining the status of religious minorities in medieval Europe. The corpus of texts is rich and varied, spanning ten centuries over a broad geographical area; these texts, in Latin, Arabic, Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic (and also in Medieval Spanish, Portuguese, and other European vernaculars), are dispersed in libraries and archives across Europe. The texts are now gathered in the RELMIN Database in their original language, with translations and commentaries. They are made available to scholars, students and citizens at large. Access is unlimited, free and perennial. and to contribute to the work of compilation. RELMIN is is buil ding a digital database of legal, judicial and normative sources defining the status of religious minorities from the 5th to the 15th century.
Here you can find out more about Lancaster’s world-class research activities, view details of publications, outputs and awards and make contact with our researchers.
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A machine learning data repository with interactive visual analytic techniques. This project is the first to combine the notion of a data repository with real-time visual analytics for interactive data mining and exploratory analysis on the web. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are combined with real-time data visualization giving the ability for researchers to seamlessly find, explore, understand, and discover key insights in a large number of public donated data sets. This large comprehensive collection of data is useful for making significant research findings as well as benchmark data sets for a wide variety of applications and domains and includes relational, attributed, heterogeneous, streaming, spatial, and time series data as well as non-relational machine learning data. All data sets are easily downloaded into a standard consistent format. We also have built a multi-level interactive visual analytics engine that allows users to visualize and interactively explore the data in a free-flowing manner.
The Common Cold Project began in 2011 with the aim of creating, documenting, and archiving a database that combines final research data from 5 prospective viral-challenge studies that were conducted over the preceding 25 years: the British Cold Study (BCS); the three Pittsburgh Cold Studies (PCS1, PCS2, and PCS3); and the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center Cold Study (PMBC). These unique studies assessed predictor (and hypothesized mediating) variables in healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, experimentally exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold, and then monitored them for development of infection and signs and symptoms of illness.
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
It is a common platform to deposit, store and share the research data in the area of social and behavioral sciences. openICPSR is undergoing development commiting international archiving standard and is currently free for all users to share their data up to a 2GB limit. It has a distribution network of over 760 institutions, governed by the Attribution 4.0 Creative Commons License and its' data catalog indexed by major search engines. OpenICPSR is a research data-sharing service that allows depositors to rapidly self-publish research data, enabling the public to access the data without charge. Otherwise via standard ICPSR deposits, one can publish and preserve reseach data with restricted-use having nominal charge. ICPSR is part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.
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The NIRD Research Data Archive is a repository that provides long-term storage for research data and is compliant with the Open Archival Information System (OAIS) reference model . The aim of the archive is to provide (public) access to published research data and to promote cross-disciplinary studies. The NIRD Research Data Archive (NIRD Archive) is in full production. The NIRD Archive will operate on a “subject to approval” basis and will accept any type of research data from Norwegian academically funded projects that is no longer considered propriatory.
The Migrant Integration Policy Index (MIPEX) is a unique tool that measures policies to integrate migrants in all EU Member States, Australia, Canada, Iceland, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland, Turkey and the USA. 167 policy indicators have been developed to create a rich, multi-dimensional picture of migrants’ opportunities to participate in society. The index is a useful tool to evaluate and compare what governments are doing to promote the integration of migrants in all the countries analysed.