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Found 26 result(s)
Intrepid Bioinformatics serves as a community for genetic researchers and scientific programmers who need to achieve meaningful use of their genetic research data – but can’t spend tremendous amounts of time or money in the process. The Intrepid Bioinformatics system automates time consuming manual processes, shortens workflow, and eliminates the threat of lost data in a faster, cheaper, and better environment than existing solutions. The system also provides the functionality and community features needed to analyze the large volumes of Next Generation Sequencing and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism data, which is generated for a wide range of purposes from disease tracking and animal breeding to medical diagnosis and treatment.
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It captures and catalogues ancient human genome and microbiome data, including raw sequence and processed data, along with metadata about its provenance and production. Included datasets are generated from ancient samples studied at the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide in collaboration with other research groups. Datasets and collections in OAGR are open data resources made freely available in a reusable form, using open file formats and licensed with minimal restrictions for reuse. Digital object identifiers (DOIs) are minted for included datasets and collections to facilitate persistent identification and citation.
The Cancer Imaging Archive is a freely accessible repository containing medical images and supporting data from cancer patients. Images are stored in DICOM file format. The images are organized as “Collections”, typically patients related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality (MRI, CT, etc) or research focus. Search functionality allows users to query across Collections or within them to filter out only the data they are most interested in.
GLOBE (Global Collaboration Engine) is an online collaborative environment that enables land change researchers to share, compare and integrate local and regional studies with global data to assess the global relevance of their work.
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
Neuroimaging Tools and Resources Collaboratory (NITRC) is currently a free one-stop-shop environment for science researchers that need resources such as neuroimaging analysis software, publicly available data sets, and computing power. Since its debut in 2007, NITRC has helped the neuroscience community to use software and data produced from research that, before NITRC, was routinely lost or disregarded, to make further discoveries. NITRC provides free access to data and enables pay-per-use cloud-based access to unlimited computing power, enabling worldwide scientific collaboration with minimal startup and cost. With NITRC and its components—the Resources Registry (NITRC-R), Image Repository (NITRC-IR), and Computational Environment (NITRC-CE)—a researcher can obtain pilot or proof-of-concept data to validate a hypothesis for a few dollars.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
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In the framework of the Collaborative Research Centre/Transregio 32 ‘Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: Monitoring, Modelling, and Data Assimilation’ (CRC/TR32, www.tr32.de), funded by the German Research Foundation from 2007 to 2018, a RDM system was self-designed and implemented. The so-called CRC/TR32 project database (TR32DB, www.tr32db.de) is operating online since early 2008. The TR32DB handles all data including metadata, which are created by the involved project participants from several institutions (e.g. Universities of Cologne, Bonn, Aachen, and the Research Centre Jülich) and research fields (e.g. soil and plant sciences, hydrology, geography, geophysics, meteorology, remote sensing). The data is resulting from several field measurement campaigns, meteorological monitoring, remote sensing, laboratory studies and modelling approaches. Furthermore, outcomes of the scientists such as publications, conference contributions, PhD reports and corresponding images are collected in the TR32DB.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
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One of the world’s largest banks of biological, psychosocial and clinical data on people suffering from mental health problems. The Signature center systematically collects biological, psychosocial and clinical indicators from patients admitted to the psychiatric emergency and at four points throughout their journey in the hospital: upon arrival to the emergency room (state of crisis), at the end of their hospital stay, as well as at the beginning and the end of outpatient treatment. For all hospital clients who agree to participate, blood specimens are collected for the purpose of measuring metabolic, genetic, toxic and infectious biomarkers, while saliva samples are collected to measure sex hormones and hair samples are collected to measure stress hormones. Questionnaire has been selected to cover important dimensional aspects of mental illness such as Behaviour and Cognition (Psychosis, Depression, Anxiety, Impulsiveness, Aggression, Suicide, Addiction, Sleep),Socio-demographic Profile (Spiritual beliefs, Social functioning, Childhood experiences, Demographic, Family background) and Medical Data (Medication, Diagnosis, Long-term health, RAMQ data). On 2016, May there are more than 1150 participants and 400 for the longitudinal Follow-Up
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In the framework of an initiative to advance biodiversity research in Germany, we established three exemplary large-scale and long-term research sites (funded by the German Research Foundation). They are termed Biodiversity Exploratories, in contrast to mainly descriptive observatories. The exploratories sustain the scientific infrastructure to develop the intellectual framework needed to address critical questions about changes in biodiversity and to evaluate the impacts of those changes for ecosystem processes. Thus, in the exploratories biodiversity and ecosystem research will be merged at a large scale and with a long-term perspective. In the first phase 2006-09 the exploratories addressed the relationship between land-use intensity, biodiversity change, and ecosystem functioning for selected taxa. In 2008 the exploratories integrated further contributing projects proposed by the German research community. Thus, the biodiversity exploratories serve as a stimulating research platform for the whole German biodiversity research community. Comprehensive data are collected for about ten years: In the Hainich, in the Swabian Alb and in the Schorfheide scientist examining from all over Germany Biodiversity and analyze ecosystem processes. Computer scientists from the University of Jena now publish first data from the Biodiversity exploratories on internet, to make it so for further research available.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
The Virtual Liver Network (VLN) represents a major research investment by the German Government focusing on work at the “bleeding edge” of Systems Biology and Systems Medicine. This Flagship Programme is tackling one of the major challenges in the life sciences: that is, how to integrate the wealth of data we have acquired post-genome, not just in a mathematical model, but more importantly in a series of models that are linked across scales to represent organ function. As the project is prototyping how to achieve true multi-scale modelling within a single organ and linking this to human physiology, it will be developing tools and protocols that can be applied to other systems, helping to drive forward the application of modelling and simulation to modern medical practice. It is the only programme of its type to our knowledge that bridges investigations from the sub-cellular through to ethically cleared patient and volunteer studies in an integrated workflow. As such, this programme is contributing significantly to the development of a new paradigm in biology and medicine.
PLEXdb is a unified gene expression resource for plants and plant pathogens. PLEXdb is a genotype to phenotype, hypothesis building information warehouse, leveraging highly parallel expression data with seamless portals to related genetic, physical, and pathway data.
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This portal applicaton brings together the data collected and published via OGC Web-services from the individual observatories and provides access of the data to the public. Therefore, it serves as a database node to provide scientists and decision makers with reliable and well accessible data and data products.
The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
The PhenoGen website shares experimental data with a worldwide community of investigators and provides a flexible, integrated, multi-resolution repository of neuroscience transcriptomic genetic data for collaborative research on genomic disorders.
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Birdata is your gateway to BirdLife Australia data including the Atlas of Australian Birds and Nest record scheme. You can use Birdata to draw bird distribution maps and generate bird lists for any part of the country. You can also join in the Atlas and submit survey information to this important environmental database. Birdata is a partnership between Birds Australia and the Tony and Lisette Lewis Foundation's WildlifeLink program to collect and make Birds Australia data available online.
The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia project is a collaboration between the Broad Institute, and the Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research and its Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation to conduct a detailed genetic and pharmacologic characterization of a large panel of human cancer models, to develop integrated computational analyses that link distinct pharmacologic vulnerabilities to genomic patterns and to translate cell line integrative genomics into cancer patient stratification. The CCLE provides public access to genomic data, analysis and visualization for about 1000 cell lines.
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The Cognitive Interaction Toolkit provides a unified view on linked research artifacts of collaborating institutions in the Bielefeld University’s strategic research area Interactive Intelligent Systems. It binds together a framework for software integration, software and hardware components, system descriptions, experiments, data sets, and publications. The research artifacts are hosted at a distributed service infrastructure that includes project oriented collaboration platforms, opensource and opendata servers, continuous integration services, and publication data servers. These are accessible via this web catalog defining a central collaborative instance for integrated research efforts.
FlyCircuit is a public database for online archiving, cell type inventory, browsing, searching, analysis and 3D visualization of individual neurons in the Drosophila brain. The FlyCircuit Database currently contains about 30,000 high resolution 3D brain neural images of the drosophila fruit fly brain that are combined into a neural circuitry network that researchers can use as a blueprint to further explore how the brain of a fruit fly processes external sensory signals (i.e. how vision, hearing, and smell are transmitted to the central nerve system).
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Australian Waterbird Surveys (AWS) is an information source of waterbird communities around Australia, based on surveys of their diversity and numbers. It relies on rigorous data collection protocols and includes more than 50 waterbird species and up to 30 years of survey data. This open source also includes the extent of flooding of thousands of wetlands observed during our surveys. As a group, waterbirds can be sentinels of the ecological health of our wetlands and rivers. We hope this free information system will help track long-term changes in the environment, provide an assessment tool for individual species, report on our national and international responsibilities and help improve the way we manage our rivers and wetlands. It has been developed with the support of research and government partners.
The DNA Bank Network was established in spring 2007 and was funded until 2011 by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The network was initiated by GBIF Germany (Global Biodiversity Information Facility). It offers a worldwide unique concept. DNA bank databases of all partners are linked and are accessible via a central web portal, providing DNA samples of complementary collections (microorganisms, protists, plants, algae, fungi and animals). The DNA Bank Network was one of the founders of the Global Genome Biodiversity Network (GGBN) and is fully merged with GGBN today. GGBN agreed on using the data model proposed by the DNA Bank Network. The Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem (BGBM) hosts the technical secretariat of GGBN and its virtual infrastructure. The main focus of the DNA Bank Network is to enhance taxonomic, systematic, genetic, conservation and evolutionary studies by providing: • high quality, long-term storage of DNA material on which molecular studies have been performed, so that results can be verified, extended, and complemented, • complete on-line documentation of each sample, including the provenance of the original material, the place of voucher deposit, information about DNA quality and extraction methodology, digital images of vouchers and links to published molecular data if available.