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Found 36 result(s)
Scholars' Bank is the open access repository for the intellectual work of faculty, students and staff at the University of Oregon and partner institution collections.
The primary function of this database is to provide authoritative information about meteorite names. The correct spelling, complete with punctuation and diacritical marks, of all known meteorites recognized by the Meteoritical Society may be found in this compilation. Official abbreviations for many meteorites are documented here as well. The database also contains status information for meteorites with provisional names, and listings for specimens of doubtful origin and pseudometeorites. A seconday purpose of this database is to provide an interface to map services for the display of geographic information about meteorites. Two are currently implemented here. If the user has installed the free NASA program World Wind, links are provided for each meteorite to zoom the program to the find location. The database also provides links to the Google Maps service for the display of find locations.
The National Cancer Data Base (NCDB), a joint program of the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons (ACoS) and the American Cancer Society (ACS), is a nationwide oncology outcomes database for more than 1,500 Commission-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico. Some 70 percent of all newly diagnosed cases of cancer in the United States are captured at the institutional level and reported to the NCDB. The NCDB, begun in 1989, now contains approximately 29 million records from hospital cancer registries across the United States. Data on all types of cancer are tracked and analyzed. These data are used to explore trends in cancer care, to create regional and state benchmarks for participating hospitals, and to serve as the basis for quality improvement.
----<<<<< This repository is no longer available. This record is out dated >>>>>----- The aim of FlyReactome, based in the Department of Genetics, University of Cambridge, is to develop a curated repository for Drosophila melanogaster pathways and reactions. The information in this database is authored by biological researchers with expertise in their fields, maintained by the FlyReactome staff.
SOHO, the Solar & Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international collaboration between ESA and NASA to study the Sun from its deep core to the outer corona and the solar wind. SOHO was launched on December 2, 1995. The SOHO spacecraft was built in Europe by an industry team led by prime contractor Matra Marconi Space (now EADS Astrium) under overall management by ESA. The twelve instruments on board SOHO were provided by European and American scientists.
The Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) is a free online registry for source codes of interest to astronomers and astrophysicists and lists codes that have been used in research that has appeared in, or been submitted to, peer-reviewed publications. The ASCL is citable by using the unique ascl ID assigned to each code. The ascl ID can be used to link to the code entry by prefacing the number with ascl.net (i.e., ascl.net/1201.001).
The Diabetes Study of Northern California (DISTANCE) conducts epidemiological and health services research in diabetes among a large, multiethnic cohort of patients in a large, integrated health care delivery system.
As with most biomedical databases, the first step is to identify relevant data from the research community. The Monarch Initiative is focused primarily on phenotype-related resources. We bring in data associated with those phenotypes so that our users can begin to make connections among other biological entities of interest. We import data from a variety of data sources. With many resources integrated into a single database, we can join across the various data sources to produce integrated views. We have started with the big players including ClinVar and OMIM, but are equally interested in boutique databases. You can learn more about the sources of data that populate our system from our data sources page https://monarchinitiative.org/about/sources.
Socrata’s cloud-based solution allows government organizations to put their data online, make data-driven decisions, operate more efficiently, and share insights with citizens.
The Drosophila Synthetic Population Resource (DSPR) consists of a new panel of over 1700 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Drosophila melanogaster, derived from two highly recombined synthetic populations, each created by intercrossing a different set of 8 inbred founder lines (with one founder line common to both populations). Complete genome sequence data for the founder lines are available, and in addition, there is a high resolution genetic map for each RIL. The DSPR has been developed as a community resource for high-resolution QTL mapping and is intended to be used widely by the Drosophila community.
The Fragile Families & Child Wellbeing Study is following a cohort of nearly 5,000 children born in large U.S. cities between 1998 and 2000 (roughly three-quarters of whom were born to unmarried parents). We refer to unmarried parents and their children as “fragile families” to underscore that they are families and that they are at greater risk of breaking up and living in poverty than more traditional families. The core Study was originally designed to primarily address four questions of great interest to researchers and policy makers: (1) What are the conditions and capabilities of unmarried parents, especially fathers?; (2) What is the nature of the relationships between unmarried parents?; (3) How do children born into these families fare?; and (4) How do policies and environmental conditions affect families and children?
Project Achilles is a systematic effort aimed at identifying and cataloging genetic vulnerabilities across hundreds of genomically characterized cancer cell lines. The project uses genome-wide genetic perturbation reagents (shRNAs or Cas9/sgRNAs) to silence or knock-out individual genes and identify those genes that affect cell survival. Large-scale functional screening of cancer cell lines provides a complementary approach to those studies that aim to characterize the molecular alterations (e.g. mutations, copy number alterations) of primary tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The overall goal of the project is to identify cancer genetic dependencies and link them to molecular characteristics in order to prioritize targets for therapeutic development and identify the patient population that might benefit from such targets.
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The Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC), a major contributor to the worldwide atmospheric research effort, consists of a set of globally distributed research stations providing consistent, standardized, long-term measurements of atmospheric trace gases, particles, spectral UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface, and physical parameters, centered around the following priorities.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
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A machine learning data repository with interactive visual analytic techniques. This project is the first to combine the notion of a data repository with real-time visual analytics for interactive data mining and exploratory analysis on the web. State-of-the-art statistical techniques are combined with real-time data visualization giving the ability for researchers to seamlessly find, explore, understand, and discover key insights in a large number of public donated data sets. This large comprehensive collection of data is useful for making significant research findings as well as benchmark data sets for a wide variety of applications and domains and includes relational, attributed, heterogeneous, streaming, spatial, and time series data as well as non-relational machine learning data. All data sets are easily downloaded into a standard consistent format. We also have built a multi-level interactive visual analytics engine that allows users to visualize and interactively explore the data in a free-flowing manner.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
Cell phones have become an important platform for the understanding of social dynamics and influence, because of their pervasiveness, sensing capabilities, and computational power. Many applications have emerged in recent years in mobile health, mobile banking, location based services, media democracy, and social movements. With these new capabilities, we can potentially be able to identify exact points and times of infection for diseases, determine who most influences us to gain weight or become healthier, know exactly how information flows among employees and productivity emerges in our work spaces, and understand how rumors spread. In an attempt to address these challenges, we release several mobile data sets here in "Reality Commons" that contain the dynamics of several communities of about 100 people each. We invite researchers to propose and submit their own applications of the data to demonstrate the scientific and business values of these data sets, suggest how to meaningfully extend these experiments to larger populations, and develop the math that fits agent-based models or systems dynamics models to larger populations. These data sets were collected with tools developed in the MIT Human Dynamics Lab and are now available as open source projects or at cost.
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TOXNET's CTD is retired in December 2019. Visit CTD (http://ctdbase.org/) at NC State University. CTD contains manually curated data describing cross-species chemical-gene/protein interactions and chemical- and gene-disease relationships. The results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying variable susceptibility and environmentally influenced diseases. These data will also provide insights into complex chemical-gene and protein interaction networks.
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On December 2019 TOXNET's ITER will be migrated to the NCBI Bookshelf. ITER contains data in support of human health risk assessments. It is compiled by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and contains data from CDC/ATSDR, Health Canada, RIVM, U.S. EPA, IARC, NSF International and independent parties offering peer-reviewed risk values. ITER provides comparison charts of international risk assessment information and explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations.
The EXFOR library contains an extensive compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data. Neutron reactions have been compiled systematically since the discovery of the neutron, while charged particle and photon reactions have been covered less extensively.