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Found 13 result(s)
4TU.ResearchData, previously known as 3TU.Datacentrum, is an archive for research data. It offers the knowledge, experience and the tools to share and safely store scientific research data in a standardized, secure and well-documented manner. 4TU.Centre for Research Data provides the research community with: Advice and support on data management; A long-term archive for scientific research data; Support for current research projects; Tools for reusing research data.
Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP) is a general purpose network analysis and graph mining library. It is written in C++ and easily scales to massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes, and billions of edges. It efficiently manipulates large graphs, calculates structural properties, generates regular and random graphs, and supports attributes on nodes and edges. SNAP is also available through the NodeXL which is a graphical front-end that integrates network analysis into Microsoft Office and Excel. The SNAP library is being actively developed since 2004 and is organically growing as a result of our research pursuits in analysis of large social and information networks. Largest network we analyzed so far using the library was the Microsoft Instant Messenger network from 2006 with 240 million nodes and 1.3 billion edges. The datasets available on the website were mostly collected (scraped) for the purposes of our research. The website was launched in July 2009.
The Ontology Lookup Service (OLS) is a repository for biomedical ontologies that aims to provide a single point of access to the latest ontology versions. The user can browse the ontologies through the website as well as programmatically via the OLS API. The OLS provides a web service interface to query multiple ontologies from a single location with a unified output format.The OLS can integrate any ontology available in the Open Biomedical Ontology (OBO) format. The OLS is an open source project hosted on Google Code.
The Oxford University Research Archive (ORA) serves as an institutional repository for the University of Oxford and is home to the scholarly research output of its members. ORA also is the home of Oxford digital theses. ORA is a permanant and secure archive of the University which preserves an array of research publications, journal articles, conference papers, working papers, theses, reports, book sections and more. Unpublished academic work is also deposited into ORA, maximising the University's research output. ORA hollds publications, theses and research data.
BCSDB database is aimed at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic and related information on bacterial carbohydrate structures. Two key points of this service are: covering - is above 90% in the scope of bacterial carbohydrates. This means the negative search answer remains valuable scientific information. And consistence - we manually check the data, and aim at hight quality error-free content. The main source of data is a retrospective literature analysis. About 25% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, ceased in 1997, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1995) with subsequent manual curation and approval. Current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between publication of new data and their deposition ~ 1 year. The scope is "bacterial carbohydrates" and covers nearly all structures of this class published up to 2016. Bacterial means that a structure has been found in bacteria or obtained by modification of those found in bacteria. Carohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds, in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
This database is aimed at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic and related information on plant and fungal carbohydrate structures. The main source of data is a retrospective literature analysis. About 4000 records were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens, plus NMR data from corresponding publications; structures published before 1995) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The scope is "plant and fungal carbohydrates" and is expected to cover nearly all structures of this class published until 2013. Plant and fungal means that a structure has been found in plants or fungi or obtained by modification of those found in these domains. Carohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds, in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
!!!Sprry.we are no longer in operation!!! The Beta Cell Biology Consortium (BCBC) was a team science initiative that was established by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It was initially funded in 2001 (RFA DK-01-014), and competitively continued both in 2005 (RFAs DK-01-17, DK-01-18) and in 2009 (RFA DK-09-011). Funding for the BCBC came to an end on August 1, 2015, and with it so did our ability to maintain active websites.!!! One of the many goals of the BCBC was to develop and maintain databases of useful research resources. A total of 813 different scientific resources were generated and submitted by BCBC investigators over the 14 years it existed. Information pertaining to 495 selected resources, judged to be the most scientifically-useful, has been converted into a static catalog, as shown below. In addition, the metadata for these 495 resources have been transferred to dkNET in the form of RDF descriptors, and all genomics data have been deposited to either ArrayExpress or GEO. Please direct questions or comments to the NIDDK Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolic Diseases (DEM).
CLAPOP is the portal of the Dutch CLARIN community. It brings together all relevant resources that were created within the CLARIN NL project and that now are part of the CLARIN NL infrastructure or that were created by other projects but are essential for the functioning of the CLARIN (NL) infrastructure. CLARIN-NL has closely cooperated with CLARIN Flanders in a number of projects. The common results of this cooperation and the results of this cooperation created by CLARIN Flanders are included here as well.
This is CSDB version 1 merged from Bacterial (BCSDB) and Plant&Fungal (PFCSDB) databases. This database aims at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic, NMR spectroscopic and other information on glycan and glycoconjugate structures of prokaryotic, plant and fungal origin. It has been merged from the Bacterial and Plant&Fungal Carbohydrate Structure Databases (BCSDB+PFCSDB). The key points of this service are: High coverage. The coverage for bacteria (up to 2016) and archaea (up to 2016) is above 80%. Similar coverage for plants and fungi is expected in the future. The database is close to complete up to 1998 for plants, and up to 2006 for fungi. Data quality. High data quality is achieved by manual curation using original publications which is assisted by multiple automatic procedures for error control. Errors present in publications are reported and corrected, when possible. Data from other databases are verified on import. Detailed annotations. Structural data are supplied with extended bibliography, assigned NMR spectra, taxon identification including strains and serogroups, and other information if available in the original publication. Services. CSDB serves as a platform for a number of computational services tuned for glycobiology, such as NMR simulation, automated structure elucidation, taxon clustering, 3D molecular modeling, statistical processing of data etc. Integration. CSDB is cross-linked to other glycoinformatics projects and NCBI databases. The data are exportable in various formats, including most widespread encoding schemes and records using GlycoRDF ontology. Free web access. Users can access the database for free via its web interface (see Help). The main source of data is retrospective literature analysis. About 20% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1996) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between the publication of new data and their deposition into CSDB is ca. 1 year. In the scope of bacterial carbohydrates, CSDB covers nearly all structures of this origin published up to 2016. Prokaryotic, plant and fungal means that a glycan was found in the organism(s) belonging to these taxonomic domains or was obtained by modification of those found in them. Carbohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
Enlighten: research data is the institutional repository for research data of the University of Glasgow. As part of the CERIF 4 Datasets (C4D) project the University is exploring an extension of the CERIF standard. We have trialled methods of recording information about datasets to make them more visible, retrievable and usable.