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Found 93 result(s)
ClinicalTrials.gov (Clinical trials) is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world.
IEDB offers easy searching of experimental data characterizing antibody and T cell epitopes studied in humans, non-human primates, and other animal species. Epitopes involved in infectious disease, allergy, autoimmunity, and transplant are included. The IEDB also hosts tools to assist in the prediction and analysis of B cell and T cell epitopes.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
This site provides access to complete, annotated genomes from bacteria and archaea (present in the European Nucleotide Archive) through the Ensembl graphical user interface (genome browser). Ensembl Bacteria contains genomes from annotated INSDC records that are loaded into Ensembl multi-species databases, using the INSDC annotation import pipeline.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
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Edmond is the institutional repository of the Max Planck Society for public research data. It enables Max Planck scientists to create citable scientific assets by describing, enriching, sharing, exposing, linking, publishing and archiving research data of all kinds. A unique feature of Edmond is the dedicated metadata management, which supports a non-restrictive metadata schema definition, as simple as you like or as complex as your parameters require. Further on, all objects within Edmond have a unique identifier and therefore can be clearly referenced in publications or reused in other contexts.
The Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database provides access to information about transmembrane proteins that exist under different conformations, with three primary subfamilies: the cys-loop superfamily, the ATP gated channels superfamily, and the glutamate activated cationic channels superfamily.**The development of the Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database was started in 1994, as part of Le Novère's work on the phylogeny of those receptors' subunits. It grew into a serious data resource, that served the community at large. However, it is not actively maintained anymore. In addition, bioinformatics technology evolved a lot over the last two decades, so that scientists can now generate quickly customised databases from trustworthy primary data resources. Therefore, we decided to officialy freeze the data resource. The resource will not disappear, and all the information and links will stay there. But people should not consider it as an up-to-date trustable resource.**
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The DRKS is an open access online register for clinical trials conducted in Germany, which allows all users to search, register and share information on clinical trials.
This database is aimed at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic and related information on plant and fungal carbohydrate structures. The main source of data is a retrospective literature analysis. About 4000 records were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens, plus NMR data from corresponding publications; structures published before 1995) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The scope is "plant and fungal carbohydrates" and is expected to cover nearly all structures of this class published until 2013. Plant and fungal means that a structure has been found in plants or fungi or obtained by modification of those found in these domains. Carohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds, in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.
In response to the declaration of the Zika virus as a public health emergency, LabKey has launched the Zika Open-Research Portal to help facilitate collaborative research. This portal provides a platform for investigators to make Zika research data, commentary and results publicly available in real-time. Projects are freely available to researchers. If you are interested in sharing real-time research through the Zika Open-Research Portal, please contact LabKey to get started.
PHI-base is a web-accessible database that catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from fungal, Oomycete and bacterial pathogens, which infect animal, plant, fungal and insect hosts. PHI-base is therfore an invaluable resource in the discovery of genes in medically and agronomically important pathogens, which may be potential targets for chemical intervention. In collaboration with the FRAC team, PHI-base also includes antifungal compounds and their target genes.
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CEEHRC represents a multi-stage funding commitment by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and multiple Canadian and international partners. The overall aim is to position Canada at the forefront of international efforts to translate new discoveries in the field of epigenetics into improved human health. The two sites will focus on sequencing human reference epigenomes and developing new technologies and protocols; they will also serve as platforms for other CEEHRC funding initiatives, such as catalyst and team grants. The complementary reference epigenome mapping efforts of the two sites will focus on a range of common human diseases. The Vancouver group will focus on the role of epigenetics in the development of cancer, including lymphoma and cancers of the ovary, colon, breast, and thyroid. The Montreal team will focus on autoimmune / inflammatory, cardio-metabolic, and neuropsychiatric diseases, using studies of identical twins as well as animal models of human disease.
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) from the Hoffmann lab and other contributors is a nationally significant life science collection. The Drosophila Clinal Data Collection contains data on populations along the eastern coast of Australia. It remains an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. The Drosophila Genomic Data Collection hosts Drosophila genomes sequenced as part of the Genomic Basis for Adaptation to Climate Change Project. 23 genomes have been sequenced as part of this project. Currently assemblies and annotations are available for Drosophila birchii, D. bunnanda, D. hydei, and D. repleta. The Drosophila Species Distribution Data Collection contains distribution data of nine drosophilid species that have been collected in Australia by the Hoffmann lab and other research groups between 1924 and 2005. More than 300 drosophilid species have been identified in the tropical and temperate forests located on the east coast of Australia. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Their varied distribution along the tropical - temperate cline provide a powerful tool for studying climate adaptation and species distribution limits.
MetaCyc is a curated database of experimentally elucidated metabolic pathways from all domains of life. MetaCyc contains pathways involved in both primary and secondary metabolism, as well as associated metabolites, reactions, enzymes, and genes. The goal of MetaCyc is to catalog the universe of metabolism by storing a representative sample of each experimentally elucidated pathway. MetaCyc applications include: Online encyclopedia of metabolism, Prediction of metabolic pathways in sequenced genomes, Support metabolic engineering via enzyme database, Metabolite database aids. metabolomics research.
>>>>!!!!<<<< AspGD data are being integrated into FungiDB. Please click here for additional details http://fungidb.org/ . Discussion of how to maximize the value of FungiDB for the Aspergillus research community will be a major topic at the upcoming AsperFest12 meeting at Asilomar (March 16-17, 2015). >>>>!!!!<<<< AspGD is an organized collection of genetic and molecular biological information about the filamentous fungi of the genus Aspergillus. Among its many species, the genus contains an excellent model organism (A. nidulans, or its teleomorph Emericella nidulans), an important pathogen of the immunocompromised (A. fumigatus), an agriculturally important toxin producer (A. flavus), and two species used in industrial processes (A. niger and A. oryzae). AspGD contains information about genes and proteins of multiple Aspergillus species; descriptions and classifications of their biological roles, molecular functions, and subcellular localizations; gene, protein, and chromosome sequence information; tools for analysis and comparison of sequences; and links to literature information; as well as a multispecies comparative genomics browser tool (Sybil) for exploration of orthology and synteny across multiple sequenced Aspergillus species.
Project Tycho is a repository for global health, particularly disease surveillance data. Project Tycho currently includes data for 92 notifiable disease conditions in the US, and up to three dengue-related conditions for 99 countries. Project Tycho has compiled data from reputable sources such as the US Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization, and National health agencies for countries around the world. Project Tycho datasets are highly standardized and have rich metadata to improve access, interoperability, and reuse of global health data for research and innovation.
The Amsterdam cohort study (ACS) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS among homosexual men started in 1984 and was expanded to include drug users in 1985. Thus far, about 2100 homosexual men and 1630 (injecting) drug users have been included of whom approximately 700 homosexual men and 550 drug users are still in active follow-up. Every 3-6 months participants complete a standardized questionnaire to obtain medical, epidemiological and social scientific information and undergo a medical examination. In addition, they have blood drawn for virological and immunological tests and storage.
The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) is a public database which contains frequency information of several immune genes such as Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA), Killer-cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIR), Major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related (MIC) genes, and a number of cytokine gene polymorphisms. The Allele Frequency Net Database (AFND) provides a central source, freely available to all, for the storage of allele frequencies from different polymorphic areas in the Human Genome. Users can contribute the results of their work into one common database and can perform database searches on information already available. We have currently collected data in allele, haplotype and genotype format. However, the success of this website will depend on you to contribute your data.
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BaAMPs is the first database dedicated to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) specifically tested against microbial biofilms. The aim of this project is to provide useful resources for the study of AMPs against biofilms to microbiologist, bioinformatics researcher and medical scientist working in this field in an open-access framework.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.