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Found 71 result(s)
The RESID Database of Protein Modifications is a comprehensive collection of annotations and structures for protein modifications including amino-terminal, carboxyl-terminal and peptide chain cross-link post-translational modifications.
DEPOD - the human DEPhOsphorylation Database (version 1.1) is a manually curated database collecting human active phosphatases, their experimentally verified protein and non-protein substrates and dephosphorylation site information, and pathways in which they are involved. It also provides links to popular kinase databases and protein-protein interaction databases for these phosphatases and substrates. DEPOD aims to be a valuable resource for studying human phosphatases and their substrate specificities and molecular mechanisms; phosphatase-targeted drug discovery and development; connecting phosphatases with kinases through their common substrates; completing the human phosphorylation/dephosphorylation network.
The Progenetix database provides an overview of copy number abnormalities in human cancer from currently 32548 array and chromosomal Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) experiments, as well as Whole Genome or Whole Exome Sequencing (WGS, WES) studies. The cancer profile data in Progenetix was curated from 1031 articles and represents 366 different cancer types, according to the International classification of Diseases in Oncology (ICD-O).
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BaAMPs is the first database dedicated to antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) specifically tested against microbial biofilms. The aim of this project is to provide useful resources for the study of AMPs against biofilms to microbiologist, bioinformatics researcher and medical scientist working in this field in an open-access framework.
Rhea is a freely available and comprehensive resource of expert-curated biochemical reactions. It has been designed to provide a non-redundant set of chemical transformations for applications such as the functional annotation of enzymes, pathway inference and metabolic network reconstruction. There are three types of reaction participants (reactants and products): Small molecules, Rhea polymers, Generic compounds. All three types of reaction participants are linked to the ChEBI database (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) which provides detailed information about structure, formula and charge. Rhea provides built-in validations that ensure both mass and charge balance of the reactions. We have populated the database with the reactions found in the enzyme classification (i.e. in the IntEnz and ENZYME databases), extending it with additional known reactions of biological interest. While the main focus of Rhea is enzyme-catalysed reactions, other biochemical reactions (including those that are often termed "spontaneous") also are included.
>>>!!! <<< The Epigenomics database was retired on June 1, 2016. All epigenomics data are available in our GEO resource https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo >>> !!! <<< The Epigenomics database provides genomics maps of stable and reprogrammable nuclear changes that control gene expression and influence health. Users can browse current epigenomic experiments as well as search, compare and browse samples from multiple biological sources in gene-specific contexts. Many epigenomes contain modifications with histone marks, DNA methylation and chromatin structure activity. NCBI Epigenomics database contains datasets from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project.
MycoBank is an on-line database aimed as a service to the mycological and scientific society by documenting mycological nomenclatural novelties (new names and combinations) and associated data, for example descriptions and illustrations. The nomenclatural novelties will each be allocated a unique MycoBank number that can be cited in the publication where the nomenclatural novelty is introduced. These numbers will also be used by the nomenclatural database Index Fungorum, with which MycoBank is associated.
INTEGRALL is a web-based platform dedicated to compile information on integrons and designed to organize all the data available for these genetic structures. INTEGRALL provides a public genetic repository for sequence data and nomenclature and offers to scientists an easy and interactive access to integron's DNA sequences, their molecular arrangements as well as their genetic contexts.
SimTK is a free project-hosting platform for the biomedical computation community that enables researchers to easily share their software, data, and models and provides the infrastructure so they can support and grow a community around their projects. It has over 62,000 members, hosts more than 960 projects from researchers around the world, and has had more than 500,000 files downloaded from it. Individuals have created SimTK projects to meet publisher and funding agencies’ software and data sharing requirements, run scientific challenges, create a collection of their community’s resources, and much more.
The PATRIC website provides an entry point to integrated data and tools for bacterial infectious disease research. The website is organized by data types and analysis tools. Primary access is provided through the PATRIC main menu, available at the top of the home page.
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APID Interactomes is a database that provides a comprehensive collection of protein interactomes for more than 400 organisms based in the integration of known experimentally validated protein-protein physical interactions (PPIs). Construction of the interactomes is done with a methodological approach to report quality levels and coverage over the proteomes for each organism included. In this way, APID provides interactomes from specific organisms that in 25 cases have more than 500 proteins. As a whole APID includes a comprehensive compendium of 90,379 distinct proteins and 678,441 singular interactions. The analytical and integrative effort done in APID unifies PPIs from primary databases of molecular interactions (BIND, BioGRID, DIP, HPRD, IntAct, MINT) and also from experimentally resolved 3D structures (PDB) where more than two distinct proteins have been identified. In this way, 8,388 structures have been analyzed to find specific protein-protein interactions reported with details of their molecular interfaces. APID also includes a new data visualization web-tool that allows the construction of sub-interactomes using query lists of proteins of interest and the visual exploration of the corresponding networks, including an interactive selection of the properties of the interactions (i.e. the reliability of the "edges" in the network) and an interactive mapping of the functional environment of the proteins (i.e. the functional annotations of the "nodes" in the network).
The Yeast Resource Center provides access to data about mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid arrays, deconvolution florescence microscopy, protein structure prediction and computational biology. These services are provided to further the goal of a complete understanding of the chemical interactions required for the maintenance and faithful reproduction of a living cell. The observation that the fundamental biological processes of yeast are conserved among all eukaryotes ensures that this knowledge will shape and advance our understanding of living systems.
The mission of the Influenza Research Database (IRD) is to provide a resource for the influenza virus research community that will facilitate an understanding of the influenza virus and how it interacts with the host organism, leading to new treatments and preventive actions. This resource will contain avian and non-human mammalian influenza surveillance data, human clinical data associated with virus extracts, phenotypic characteristics of viruses isolated from extracts, and all genomic and proteomic data available in public repositories for influenza viruses.
MetaboLights is a database for Metabolomics experiments and derived information. The database is cross-species, cross-technique and covers metabolite structures and their reference spectra as well as their biological roles, locations and concentrations, and experimental data from metabolic experiments.
InterPro collects information about protein sequence analysis and classification, providing access to a database of predictive protein signatures used for the classification and automatic annotation of proteins and genomes. Sequences in InterPro are classified at superfamily, family, and subfamily. InterPro predicts the occurrence of functional domains, repeats, and important sites, and adds in-depth annotation such as GO terms to the protein signatures.
The Antimicrobial Peptide Database (APD) was originally created by a graduate student, Zhe Wang, as his master's thesis in the laboratory of Dr. Guangshun Wang. The project was initiated in 2002 and the first version of the database was open to the public in August 2003. It contained 525 peptide entries, which can be searched in multiple ways, including APD ID, peptide name, amino acid sequence, original location, PDB ID, structure, methods for structural determination, peptide length, charge, hydrophobic content, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anticancer, and hemolytic activity. Some results of this bioinformatics tool were reported in the 2004 database paper. The peptide data stored in the APD were gleaned from the literature (PubMed, PDB, Google, and Swiss-Prot) manually in over a decade.
The Department of Energy Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase) is a software and data platform designed to meet the grand challenge of systems biology: predicting and designing biological function. KBase integrates data and tools in a unified graphical interface so users do not need to access them from numerous sources or learn multiple systems in order to create and run sophisticated systems biology workflows. Users can perform large-scale analyses and combine multiple lines of evidence to model plant and microbial physiology and community dynamics. KBase is the first large-scale bioinformatics system that enables users to upload their own data, analyze it (along with collaborator and public data), build increasingly realistic models, and share and publish their workflows and conclusions. KBase aims to provide a knowledgebase: an integrated environment where knowledge and insights are created and multiplied.
The UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef) provide clustered sets of sequences from the UniProt Knowledgebase (including isoforms) and selected UniParc records in order to obtain complete coverage of the sequence space at several resolutions while hiding redundant sequences (but not their descriptions) from view.