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Found 15 result(s)
The German Text Archive (Deutsches Textarchiv, DTA) presents online a selection of key German-language works in various disciplines from the 17th to 19th centuries. The electronic full-texts are indexed linguistically and the search facilities tolerate a range of spelling variants. The DTA presents German-language printed works from around 1650 to 1900 as full text and as digital facsimile. The selection of texts was made on the basis of lexicographical criteria and includes scientific or scholarly texts, texts from everyday life, and literary works. The digitalisation was made from the first edition of each work. Using the digital images of these editions, the text was first typed up manually twice (‘double keying’). To represent the structure of the text, the electronic full-text was encoded in conformity with the XML standard TEI P5. The next stages complete the linguistic analysis, i.e. the text is tokenised, lemmatised, and the parts of speech are annotated. The DTA thus presents a linguistically analysed, historical full-text corpus, available for a range of questions in corpus linguistics. Thanks to the interdisciplinary nature of the DTA Corpus, it also offers valuable source-texts for neighbouring disciplines in the humanities, and for scientists, legal scholars and economists.
RADAR service offers the ability to search for research data descriptions of the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke). The service includes descriptions of research data for agriculture, forestry and food sectors, game management, fisheries and environment. The public web service aims to facilitate discovering subjects of natural resources studies. In addition to Luke's research data descriptions one can search metadata of the Finnish Environment Institute (SYKE). The interface between Luke and SYKE metadata services combines Luke's research data descriptions and SYKE's descriptions of spatial datasets and data systems into a unified search service.
The Universal Protein Resource (UniProt) is a comprehensive resource for protein sequence and annotation data. The UniProt databases are the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB), the UniProt Reference Clusters (UniRef), and the UniProt Archive (UniParc). The UniProt Metagenomic and Environmental Sequences (UniMES) database is a repository specifically developed for metagenomic and environmental data.
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
The European Environment Agency (EEA) is an agency of the European Union. Our task is to provide sound, independent information on the environment. We are a major information source for those involved in developing, adopting, implementing and evaluating environmental policy, and also the general public. Currently, the EEA has 33 member countries. EEA's mandate is: To help the Community and member countries make informed decisions about improving the environment, integrating environmental considerations into economic policies and moving towards sustainability To coordinate the European environment information and observation network (Eionet)
The European Database of Seismogenic Faults (EDSF) was compiled in the framework of the EU Project SHARE, Work Package 3, Task 3.2. EDSF includes only faults that are deemed to be capable of generating earthquakes of magnitude equal to or larger than 5.5 and aims at ensuring a homogeneous input for use in ground-shaking hazard assessment in the Euro-Mediterranean area. Several research institutions participated in this effort with the contribution of many scientists (see the Database section for a full list). The EDSF database and website are hosted and maintained by INGV.
The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database provides a specialist database for sequences of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and includes the official sequences named by the WHO Nomenclature Committee For Factors of the HLA System. The IPD-IMGT/HLA Database is part of the international ImMunoGeneTics project (IMGT). The database uses the 2010 naming convention for HLA alleles in all tools herein. To aid in the adoption of the new nomenclature, all search tools can be used with both the current and pre-2010 allele designations. The pre-2010 nomenclature designations are only used where older reports or outputs have been made available for download.
The domain of the IDS repository is the German language, mainly in its current form (contemporary New High German). Its designated community are national and international researchers in German and general linguistics. As an institutional repository, the repository provides long term archival of two important IDS projects: the Deutsches Referenzkorpus (‘German Reference Corpus’, DeReKo), which curates a large corpus of written German language, and the Archiv für Gesprochenes Deutsch (‘Archive of Spoken German’, AGD), which curates several corpora of spoken German. In addition, the repository enables germanistic researchers from IDS and from other research facilities and universities to deposit their research data for long term archival of data and metadata arising from research projects.
STOREDB is a platform for the archiving and sharing of primary data and outputs of all kinds, including epidemiological and experimental data, from research on the effects of radiation. It also provides a directory of bioresources and databases containing information and materials that investigators are willing to share. STORE supports the creation of a radiation research commons.
The repository of the Hamburg Centre for Speech Corpora is used for archiving, maintenance, distribution and development of spoken language corpora. These usually consist of audio and / or video recordings, transcriptions and other data and structured metadata. The corpora treat the focus on multilingualism and are generally freely available for research and teaching. Most of the measures maintained by the HZSK corpora were created in the years 2000-2011 in the framework of the SFB 538 "Multilingualism" at the University of Hamburg. The HZSK however also strives to take linguistic data from other projects or contexts, and to provide also the scientific community for research and teaching are available, provided that they are compatible with the current focus of HZSK, ie especially spoken language and multilingualism.
Mulce (MUltimodal contextualized Learner Corpus Exchange) is a research project supported by the National Research Agency (ANR programme: "Corpus and Tools in the Humanities", ANR-06-CORP-006). A teaching corpus (LETEC - Learning and Teaching Corpora) combines a systematic and structured data set, particularly of interactional data, and traces left by a training course experimentation, conducted partially or completely online and completed by additional technical, human, pedagogical and scientific information to enable the data to be analysed in context.
Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is a freely available dictionary of 'small molecular entities'. The term 'molecular entity' encompasses any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities in question are either products of nature or synthetic products used to intervene in the processes of living organisms (either deliberately, as for drugs, or unintentionally', as for chemicals in the environment). The qualifier 'small' implies the exclusion of entities directly encoded by the genome, and thus as a rule nucleic acids, proteins and peptides derived from proteins by cleavage are not included.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
In collaboration with other centres in the CLARIN-D consortium, the UdS CLARIN-D centre enables eHumanities by providing a service for hosting and processing language resources (notably corpora) for members of the research community. The UdS CLARIN-D centre thus contributes of lifting the fragmentation of language resources by assisting members of the research community in preparing language materials in such a way that easy discovery is ensured, interchange is facilitated and preservation is enabled by enriching such materials with meta-information, transforming them into sustainable formats and hosting them. We have an explicit mission to archive language resources especially multilingual corpora (parallel, comparable) and corpora including specific registers, both collected by associated researchers as well as researchers who are not affiliated with us.
Isidore is a platform of search allowing the access to digital data of Humanities and Social Sciences. Open to all and especially to teachers, researchers, PhD students, and students, it relies on the principles of Web of data and provides access to data in free access (open access).