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Found 94 result(s)
The Linguistic Data Consortium (LDC) is an open consortium of universities, libraries, corporations and government research laboratories. It was formed in 1992 to address the critical data shortage then facing language technology research and development. Initially, LDC's primary role was as a repository and distribution point for language resources. Since that time, and with the help of its members, LDC has grown into an organization that creates and distributes a wide array of language resources. LDC also supports sponsored research programs and language-based technology evaluations by providing resources and contributing organizational expertise. LDC is hosted by the University of Pennsylvania and is a center within the University’s School of Arts and Sciences.
>>>>>!!!<<<<< As of 01/12/2015, deposit of data on SLDR website will be suspended to allow the public opening of Ortolang platform https://www.ortolang.fr/#/market/home .>>>>>!!!<<<<<
It is a common platform to deposit, store and share the research data in the area of social and behavioral sciences. openICPSR is undergoing development commiting international archiving standard and is currently free for all users to share their data up to a 2GB limit. It has a distribution network of over 760 institutions, governed by the Attribution 4.0 Creative Commons License and its' data catalog indexed by major search engines. OpenICPSR is a research data-sharing service that allows depositors to rapidly self-publish research data, enabling the public to access the data without charge. Otherwise via standard ICPSR deposits, one can publish and preserve reseach data with restricted-use having nominal charge. ICPSR is part of the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.
The Common Cold Project began in 2011 with the aim of creating, documenting, and archiving a database that combines final research data from 5 prospective viral-challenge studies that were conducted over the preceding 25 years: the British Cold Study (BCS); the three Pittsburgh Cold Studies (PCS1, PCS2, and PCS3); and the Pittsburgh Mind-Body Center Cold Study (PMBC). These unique studies assessed predictor (and hypothesized mediating) variables in healthy adults aged 18 to 55 years, experimentally exposed them to a virus that causes the common cold, and then monitored them for development of infection and signs and symptoms of illness.
BrainMaps.org, launched in May 2005, is an interactive multiresolution next-generation brain atlas that is based on over 20 million megapixels of sub-micron resolution, annotated, scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Currently featured are complete brain atlas datasets for various species, including Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba.
RunMyCode is a novel cloud-based platform that enables scientists to openly share the code and data that underlie their research publications. The web service only requires a web browser as all calculations are done on a dedicated cloud computer. Once the results are ready, they are automatically displayed to the user.
SeedMe is a result of a decade of onerous experience in preparing and sharing visualization results from supercomputing simulations with many researchers at different geographic locations using different operating systems. It’s been a labor–intensive process, unsupported by useful tools and procedures for sharing information. SeedMe provides a secure and easy-to-use functionality for efficiently and conveniently sharing results that aims to create transformative impact across many scientific domains.
NICHD DASH is a centralized resource for researchers to store and access data from NICHD-funded research studies to use for secondary research. It serves as a mechanism for NICHD-funded extramural and intramural investigators to share de-identified research data from studies in accordance with the NIH Data Sharing Policy and the NIH Genomic Data Sharing Policy.
The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge sharing. NEX combines supercomputing, Earth system modeling, workflow management, NASA remote sensing data feeds, and a knowledge sharing platform to deliver a complete work environment in which users can explore and analyze large datasets, run modeling codes, collaborate on new or existing projects, and quickly share results among the Earth Science communities. Includes some local data collections as well as links to data on other sites. On January 31st, 2019, the NEX portal will be down-scoped; member logins will be suspended and the portal contents transitioned to a static set of archives. New projects and resources will no longer be possible after this occurs.
>>>!!!<<< 08.08.2019: Plexdb is no longer online, URLold: http://www.plexdb.org/index.php >>>!!!<<< >>>>!!!! <<<< 13.12.2018: PLEXdb is now a static site after funding stopped from NSF. We have stopped registration of new users; but past users who have data can login when needed and interact with the site. You can download data using the authentication provided at the download page. >>>>!!!!<<<< PLEXdb is a unified gene expression resource for plants and plant pathogens. PLEXdb is a genotype to phenotype, hypothesis building information warehouse, leveraging highly parallel expression data with seamless portals to related genetic, physical, and pathway data.
TCIA is a service which de-identifies and hosts a large archive of medical images of cancer accessible for public download. The data are organized as “collections”; typically patients’ imaging related by a common disease (e.g. lung cancer), image modality or type (MRI, CT, digital histopathology, etc) or research focus. Supporting data related to the images such as patient outcomes, treatment details, genomics and expert analyses are also provided when available.
The Andrews Forest is a place of inquiry. Our mission is to support research on forests, streams, and watersheds, and to foster strong collaboration among ecosystem science, education, natural resource management, and the humanities. Our place and our work are administered cooperatively by the USDA Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Research Station, Oregon State University, and the Willamette National Forest. First established in 1948 as an US Forest Service Experimental Forest, the H.J. Andrews is a 16,000-acre ecological research site in Oregon's beautiful western Cascades Mountains. The landscape is home to iconic Pacific Northwest old-growth forests of Cedar and Hemlock, and moss-draped ancient Douglas Firs; steep terrain; and fast, cold-running streams. In 1980 the Andrews became a charter member of the National Science Foundation's Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Program.
The PhenoGen website shares experimental data with a worldwide community of investigators and provides a flexible, integrated, multi-resolution repository of neuroscience transcriptomic genetic data for collaborative research on genomic disorders.
This hub supports the geospatial modeling, data analysis and visualization needs of the broad research and education communities through hosting of groups, datasets, tools, training materials, and educational contents.
The Comparative Study of Electoral Systems (CSES) is a collaborative, cross-national program of comparative electoral behavior among over 60 election study teams from around the world. The CSES allows examination into how societal, political, economic and structural contexts shape citizen behavior and condition democratic choice; the nature of political and social divisions; and how citizens in different political systems evaluate democratic institutions and processes. Participating countries include a common module of survey questions in their post-election studies. The resulting data are deposited along with voting, demographic, district and macro variables. The studies are then merged into a single, free, public dataset for use in comparative study and cross-level analysis. The research agenda, questionnaires, and study design are developed by an international committee of leading scholars of electoral politics and political science. The design is implemented in each country by their foremost social scientists.
NAHDAP acquires, preserves and disseminates data relevant to drug addiction and HIV research. By preserving and making available an easily accessible library of electronic data on drug addiction and HIV infection in the United States, NAHDAP offers scholars the opportunity to conduct secondary analysis on major issues of social and behavioral sciences and public policy
The CALIPSO satellite provides new insight into the role that clouds and atmospheric aerosols play in regulating Earth's weather, climate, and air quality. CALIPSO combines an active lidar instrument with passive infrared and visible imagers to probe the vertical structure and properties of thin clouds and aerosols over the globe. CALIPSO was launched on April 28, 2006, with the CloudSat satellite. CALIPSO and CloudSat are highly complementary and together provide new, never-before-seen 3D perspectives of how clouds and aerosols form, evolve, and affect weather and climate. CALIPSO and CloudSat fly in formation with three other satellites in the A-train constellation to enable an even greater understanding of our climate system.
Project Tycho is a repository for global health, particularly disease surveillance data. Project Tycho currently includes data for 92 notifiable disease conditions in the US, and up to three dengue-related conditions for 99 countries. Project Tycho has compiled data from reputable sources such as the US Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization, and National health agencies for countries around the world. Project Tycho datasets are highly standardized and have rich metadata to improve access, interoperability, and reuse of global health data for research and innovation.
INDI was formed as a next generation FCP effort. INDI aims to provide a model for the broader imaging community while simultaneously creating a public dataset capable of dwarfing those that most groups could obtain individually.
The National Institute of Mental Health Data Archive (NDA) makes available human subjects data collected from hundreds of research projects across many scientific domains. The NDA provides infrastructure for sharing research data, tools, methods, and analyses enabling collaborative science and discovery. De-identified human subjects data, harmonized to a common standard, are available to qualified researchers. Summary data is available to all. The primary point of entry to the NDA is currently through the National Database for Autism Research (NDAR) website, which serves the autism research community. All NDA repositories can be accessed through this website for data contribution and querying with other scientific communities, allowing for aggregation and secondary analysis of data.
The UCD Digital Library is a platform for exploring cultural heritage, engaging with digital scholarship, and accessing research data. The UCD Digital Library allows you to search, browse and explore a growing collection of historical materials, photographs, art, interviews, letters, and other exciting content, that have been digitised and made freely available.
Under the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) the Working Group on Coupled Modelling (WGCM) established the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP) as a standard experimental protocol for studying the output of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs). CMIP provides a community-based infrastructure in support of climate model diagnosis, validation, intercomparison, documentation and data access. This framework enables a diverse community of scientists to analyze GCMs in a systematic fashion, a process which serves to facilitate model improvement. Virtually the entire international climate modeling community has participated in this project since its inception in 1995. The Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI) archives much of the CMIP data and provides other support for CMIP. We are now beginning the process towards the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report and with it the CMIP5 intercomparison activity. The CMIP5 (CMIP Phase 5) experiment design has been finalized with the following suites of experiments: I Decadal Hindcasts and Predictions simulations, II "long-term" simulations, III "atmosphere-only" (prescribed SST) simulations for especially computationally-demanding models. The new ESGF peer-to-peer (P2P) enterprise system (http://pcmdi9.llnl.gov) is now the official site for CMIP5 model output. The old gateway (http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov) is deprecated and now shut down permanently.