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Found 11 result(s)
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
This Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database (Animal QTLdb) is designed to house all publicly available QTL and trait mapping data (i.e. trait and genome location association data; collectively called "QTL data" on this site) on livestock animal species for easily locating and making comparisons within and between species. New database tools are continuely added to align the QTL and association data to other types of genome information, such as annotated genes, RH / SNP markers, and human genome maps. Besides the QTL data from species listed below, the QTLdb is open to house QTL/association date from other animal species where feasible. Note that the JAS along with other journals, now require that new QTL/association data be entered into a QTL database as part of their publication requirements.
The Expression Atlas provides information on gene expression patterns under different biological conditions such as a gene knock out, a plant treated with a compound, or in a particular organism part or cell. It includes both microarray and RNA-seq data. The data is re-analysed in-house to detect interesting expression patterns under the conditions of the original experiment. There are two components to the Expression Atlas, the Baseline Atlas and the Differential Atlas. The Baseline Atlas displays information about which gene products are present (and at what abundance) in "normal" conditions (e.g. tissue, cell type). It aims to answer questions such as "which genes are specifically expressed in human kidney?". This component of the Expression Atlas consists of highly-curated and quality-checked RNA-seq experiments from ArrayExpress. It has data for many different animal and plant species. New experiments are added as they become available. The Differential Atlas allows users to identify genes that are up- or down-regulated in a wide variety of different experimental conditions such as yeast mutants, cadmium treated plants, cystic fibrosis or the effect on gene expression of mind-body practice. Both microarray and RNA-seq experiments are included in the Differential Atlas. Experiments are selected from ArrayExpress and groups of samples are manually identified for comparison e.g. those with wild type genotype compared to those with a gene knock out. Each experiment is processed through our in-house differential expression statistical analysis pipeline to identify genes with a high probability of differential expression.
Neuroimaging Tools and Resources Collaboratory (NITRC) is currently a free one-stop-shop environment for science researchers that need resources such as neuroimaging analysis software, publicly available data sets, and computing power. Since its debut in 2007, NITRC has helped the neuroscience community to use software and data produced from research that, before NITRC, was routinely lost or disregarded, to make further discoveries. NITRC provides free access to data and enables pay-per-use cloud-based access to unlimited computing power, enabling worldwide scientific collaboration with minimal startup and cost. With NITRC and its components—the Resources Registry (NITRC-R), Image Repository (NITRC-IR), and Computational Environment (NITRC-CE)—a researcher can obtain pilot or proof-of-concept data to validate a hypothesis for a few dollars.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
ZFIN serves as the zebrafish model organism database. The long term goals for ZFIN are a) to be the community database resource for the laboratory use of zebrafish, b) to develop and support integrated zebrafish genetic, genomic and developmental information, c) to maintain the definitive reference data sets of zebrafish research information, d) to link this information extensively to corresponding data in other model organism and human databases, e) to facilitate the use of zebrafish as a model for human biology and f) to serve the needs of the research community. ZIRC is the Zebrafish International Resource Center, an independent NIH-funded facility providing a wide range of zebrafish lines, probes and health services. ZFIN works closely with ZIRC to connect our genetic data with available probes and fish lines.
The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR) is a collection of databases and tools designed to help researchers study the genetics of human ageing using modern approaches such as functional genomics, network analyses, systems biology and evolutionary analyses.
The sequencing of several bird genomes and the anticipated sequencing of many more provided the impetus to develop a model organism database devoted to the taxonomic class: Aves. Birds provide model organisms important to the study of neurobiology, immunology, genetics, development, oncology, virology, cardiovascular biology, evolution and a variety of other life sciences. Many bird species are also important to agriculture, providing an enormous worldwide food source worldwide. Genomic approaches are proving invaluable to studying traits that affect meat yield, disease resistance, behavior, and bone development along with many other factors affecting productivity. In this context, BirdBase will serve both biomedical and agricultural researchers.
The mission of the Influenza Research Database (IRD) is to provide a resource for the influenza virus research community that will facilitate an understanding of the influenza virus and how it interacts with the host organism, leading to new treatments and preventive actions. This resource will contain avian and non-human mammalian influenza surveillance data, human clinical data associated with virus extracts, phenotypic characteristics of viruses isolated from extracts, and all genomic and proteomic data available in public repositories for influenza viruses.
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KEGG is a database resource for understanding high-level functions and utilities of the biological system, such as the cell, the organism and the ecosystem, from molecular-level information, especially large-scale molecular datasets generated by genome sequencing and other high-throughput experimental technologies