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Found 282 result(s)
GallusReactome is a free, online, open-source, curated resource of core pathways and reactions in chicken biology. Information is authored by expert biological researchers, maintained by the GallusReactome editorial staff and cross-referenced to the NCBI Entrez Gene, Ensembl and UniProt databases, the KEGG and ChEBI small molecule databases, PubMed, and the Gene Ontology (GO).
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
The Agricultural and Environmental Data Archive (AEDA) is the direct result of a project managed by the Freshwater Biological Association in partnership with the Centre for e-Research at King's College London, and funded by the Department for the Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (Defra). This project ran from January 2011 until December 2014 and was called the DTC Archive Project, because it was initially related to the Demonstration Test Catchments Platform developed by Defra. The archive was also designed to hold data from the GHG R&D Platform (www.ghgplatform.org.uk). After the DTC Archive Project was completed the finished archive was renamed as AEDA to reflect it's broader remit to archive data from any and all agricultural and environmental research activities.
This classic collection of test cases for validation of turbulence models started as an EU / ERCOFTAC project led by Pr. W. Rodi in 1995. It is maintained by Dr. T. Craft at Manchester since 1999. Initialy limited to experimental data, computational results, and results and conclusions drawn from the ERCOFTAC Workshops on Refined Turbulence Modelling (SIG15). At the moment, each case should contain at least a brief description, some data to download, and references to published work. Some cases contain significantly more information than this.
PhytoPath is a new bioinformatics resource that integrates genome-scale data from important plant pathogen species with literature-curated information about the phenotypes of host infection. Using the Ensembl Genomes browser, it provides access to complete genome assembly and gene models of priority crop and model-fungal, oomycete and bacterial phytopathogens. PhytoPath also links genes to disease progression using data from the curated PHI-base resource. PhytoPath portal is a joint project bringing together Ensembl Genomes with PHI-base, a community-curated resource describing the role of genes in pathogenic infection. PhytoPath provides access to genomic and phentoypic data from fungal and oomycete plant pathogens, and has enabled a considerable increase in the coverage of phytopathogen genomes in Ensembl Fungi and Ensembl Protists. PhytoPath also provides enhanced searching of the PHI-base resource as well as the fungi and protists in Ensembl Genomes.
The Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR) is an international digital repository for the digital records of archaeological investigations. tDAR’s use, development, and maintenance are governed by Digital Antiquity, an organization dedicated to ensuring the long-term preservation of irreplaceable archaeological data and to broadening the access to these data.
The LJMU Research Data Repository is the University's institutional repository where researchers can safely deposit and store research data on an Open Access basis. Data stored in the LJMU Research Data Repository can be made freely available to anyone online and located by users of web search engines.
The University research data repository – BathSPAdata – enables staff to upload their research data into a secure space, and to share this data publicly where appropriate, or where funders or publishers require this as part of their conditions. Resources and toolkits for external use can be made available through this forum, and can be used by Schools, policy makers, business and industry, and the cultural sector.
The CATH database is a hierarchical domain classification of protein structures in the Protein Data Bank. Protein structures are classified using a combination of automated and manual procedures. There are four major levels in the CATH hierarchy; Class, Architecture, Topology and Homologous superfamily.
The Pfam database is a large collection of protein families, each represented by multiple sequence alignments and hidden Markov models (HMMs).
SeaDataNet is a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet infrastructure network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. As a research infrastructure, SeaDataNet contributes to build research excellence in Europe.
The Protein Circular Dichroism Data Bank (PCDDB) provides and accepts a circular dichroism spectra data. The PCDDB and it's parent organization, the Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (ISMB), investigate molecular structure using techniques such as biomolecular nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography and computational structure prediction, as methods for protein production and biological characterization.
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While focused on supporting the scientific community, ATCC activities range widely, from repository-related operations to providing specialized services, conducting in-house R&D and intellectual property management. ATCC serves U.S. and international researchers by characterizing cell lines, bacteria, viruses, fungi and protozoa, as well as developing and evaluating assays and techniques for validating research resources and preserving and distributing biological materials to the public and private sector research communities. Our management philosophy emphasizes customer satisfaction, value addition, cost-effective operations and competitive benchmarking for all areas of our enterprise.
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE). The modENCODE Project is being run as an open consortium and welcomes any investigator willing to abide by the criteria for participation that have been established for the project. Both computational and experimental approaches are being applied by modENCODE investigators to study the genomes of D. melanogaster and C. elegans. An added benefit of studying functional elements in model organisms is the ability to biologically validate the elements discovered using methods that cannot be applied in humans. The comprehensive dataset that is expected to result from the modENCODE Project will provide important insights into the biology of D. melanogaster and C. elegans as well as other organisms, including humans.
MicrosporidiaDB belongs to the EuPathDB family of databases and is an integrated genomic and functional genomic database for the phylum Microsporidia. In its first iteration (released in early 2010), MicrosporidiaDB contains the genomes of two Encephalitozoon species (see below). MicrosporidiaDB integrates whole genome sequence and annotation and will rapidly expand to include experimental data and environmental isolate sequences provided by community researchers. The database includes supplemental bioinformatics analyses and a web interface for data-mining.
Apollo (previously DSpace@Cambridge) is the University of Cambridge’s institutional repository, preserving and providing access to content created by members of the University. The repository stores a range of content and provides different levels of access, but its primary focus is on providing open access to the University’s research publications.
EartH2Observe brings together the findings from European FP projects DEWFORA, GLOWASIS, WATCH, GEOWOW and others. It will integrate available global earth observations (EO), in-situ datasets and models and will construct a global water resources re-analysis dataset of significant length (several decades). The resulting data will allow for improved insights on the full extent of available water and existing pressures on global water resources in all parts of the water cycle. The project will support efficient and globally consistent water management and decision making by providing comprehensive multi-scale (regional, continental and global) water resources observations. It will test new EO data sources, extend existing processing algorithms and combine data from multiple satellite missions in order to improve the overall resolution and reliability of EO data included in the re-analysis dataset. The resulting datasets will be made available through an open Water Cycle Integrator data portal https://wci.earth2observe.eu/ : the European contribution to the GEOSS/WCI approach. The datasets will be downscaled for application in case-studies at regional and local levels, and optimized based on identified European and local needs supporting water management and decision making . Actual data access: https://wci.earth2observe.eu/data/group/earth2observe
The British Geological Survey (BGS), the world’s oldest national geological survey, has over 400 datasets including environmental monitoring data, digital databases, physical collections (borehole core, rocks, minerals and fossils), records and archives.
The Natural Environment Research Council's Data Repository for Atmospheric Science and Earth Observation. The Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) serves the environmental science community through three data centres, data analysis environments, and participation in a host of relevant research projects. We aim to support environmental science, further environmental data archival practices, and develop and deploy new technologies to enhance access to data. Additionally we provide services to aid large scale data analysis.
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
The National River Flow Archive is the primary archive of daily and peak river flows for the United Kingdom. The archive incorporates daily, monthly and flood peak data from over 1500 gauging stations. The NRFA holds a wide range of hydrological information to assist in the understanding and interpretation of measured river flows. In addition to time series of gauged river flow, the data centre maintains hydrometric information relating to the gauging stations and the catchments they command and data quantifying other parts of the hydrological cycle.
The National Digital Archive of Datasets (NDAD) provides access to archived datasets and documents from United Kingdom government departments which can be searched or browsed by subjects such as armed forces service or wills and death duties. Statistics and information gathered through census data as well as public records are used to compile the available datasets. All datasets are available to download and contain a record summary as well as custodial history, background on the source of the data and whether or not data may be added to the dataset in the future.
Born in Bradford is one of the biggest and most important medical research studies undertaken in the UK. The project started in 2007 and is looking to answer questions about our health by tracking the lives of 13,500 babies and their families and will provide information for studies across the UK and around the world. The aim of Born in Bradford is to find out more about the causes of childhood illness by studying children from all cultures and backgrounds as their lives unfold.
The International Plant Names Index (IPNI) is a database of the names and associated basic bibliographical details of seed plants, ferns and lycophytes. Its goal is to eliminate the need for repeated reference to primary sources for basic bibliographic information about plant names. The data are freely available and are gradually being standardized and checked. IPNI is a dynamic resource, depending on direct contributions by all members of the botanical community. IPNI is the product of a collaboration between The Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, The Harvard University Herbaria, and the Australian National Herbarium.