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Found 292 result(s)
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
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The Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) combines and provides scientifically collected data from a wide range of sources such as museums, herbaria, community groups, government departments, individuals and universities. Data records consist of images, literature, molecular DNA data, identification keys, species interaction data, species profile data, nomenclature, source data, conservation indicators, and spatial data.
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SIMBAD astronomical database is the world reference database for the identification of astronomical objects and provides basic data, cross-identifications, bibliography and measurements for astronomical objects outside the solar system. Using VizieR, the catalogue service for the CDS reference collection of astronomical catalogues and tables published in academic journals and the Aladin interactive software sky atlas for access, visualization and analysis of astronomical images, surveys, catalogues, databases and related data. Simbad bibliographic survey began in 1950 for stars (at least bright stars) and in 1983 for all other objects (outside the solar system)
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Scans of plates obtained at Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Königstuhl and German-Spanish Astronomical Center (Calar Alto Observatory), Spain, 1900 through 1999.
You will find in the Access to Archival Databases (AAD) resource online access to records in a small selection of historic databases preserved permanently in NARA. Out of the nearly 200,000 data files in its holdings, NARA has selected approximately 475 of them for public searching through AAD. We selected these data because the records identify specific persons, geographic areas, organizations, and dates. The records cover a wide variety of civilian and military functions and have many genealogical, social, political, and economic research uses. AAD provides: Access to over 85 million historic electronic records created by more than 30 agencies of the U.S. federal government and from collections of donated historical materials. Both free-text and fielded searching options. The ability to retrieve, print, and download records with the specific information that you seek. Information to help you find and understand the records.
The Harvard Dataverse is open to all scientific data from all disciplines worldwide. It includes the world's largest collection of social science research data. It is hosting data for projects, archives, researchers, journals, organizations, and institutions.
NeuroMorpho.Org is a centrally curated inventory of digitally reconstructed neurons associated with peer-reviewed publications. It contains contributions from over 80 laboratories worldwide and is continuously updated as new morphological reconstructions are collected, published, and shared. To date, NeuroMorpho.Org is the largest collection of publicly accessible 3D neuronal reconstructions and associated metadata which can be used for detailed single cell simulations.
In early 2010 we updated the site to facilitate more rapid transfer of our data to the public database and focus our efforts on the core mission of providing expression pattern images to the research community. The original database http://www.fruitfly.org/index.html reproduced functions available on FlyBase, complicating our updates by the requirement to re-synchronize with FlyBase updates. Our expression reports on the new site still link to FlyBase gene reports, but we no longer reproduce FlyBase functions and therefore can update expression data on an ongoing basis instead of more infrequent major releases. All the functions relating to the expression patterns remain and we soon will add an option to search expression patterns by image similarity, in addition to annotation term searches. In a transitional phase we will leave both the old and the new sites up, but the newer data (post Release 2) will appear only on the new website. We welcome any feedback or requests for additional features. - The goals of the Drosophila Genome Center are to finish the sequence of the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster to high quality and to generate and maintain biological annotations of this sequence. In addition to genomic sequencing, the BDGP is 1) producing gene disruptions using P element-mediated mutagenesis on a scale unprecedented in metazoans; 2) characterizing the sequence and expression of cDNAs; and 3) developing informatics tools that support the experimental process, identify features of DNA sequence, and allow us to present up-to-date information about the annotated sequence to the research community.
The focus of CLARIN INT Portal is on resources that are relevant to the lexicological study of the Dutch language and on resources relevant for research in and development of language and speech technology. For Example: lexicons, lexical databases, text corpora, speech corpora, language and speech technology tools, etc. The resources are: Cornetto-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Corpus of Contemporary Dutch (Corpus Hedendaags Nederlands), Corpus Gysseling, Corpus VU-DNC (VU University Diachronic News text Corpus), Dictionary of the Frisian Language (Woordenboek der Friese Taal), DuELME-LMF (Lexicon Markup Framework), Language Portal (Taalportaal), Namescape, NERD (Named Entity Recognition and Disambiguation) and TICCLops (Text-Induced Corpus Clean-up online processing system).
The modENCODE Project, Model Organism ENCyclopedia Of DNA Elements, was initiated by the funding of applications received in response to Requests for Applications (RFAs) HG-06-006, entitled Identification of All Functional Elements in Selected Model Organism Genomes and HG-06-007, entitled A Data Coordination Center for the Model Organism ENCODE Project (modENCODE). The modENCODE Project is being run as an open consortium and welcomes any investigator willing to abide by the criteria for participation that have been established for the project. Both computational and experimental approaches are being applied by modENCODE investigators to study the genomes of D. melanogaster and C. elegans. An added benefit of studying functional elements in model organisms is the ability to biologically validate the elements discovered using methods that cannot be applied in humans. The comprehensive dataset that is expected to result from the modENCODE Project will provide important insights into the biology of D. melanogaster and C. elegans as well as other organisms, including humans.
The Database contains all publicly available HMS LINCS datasets and information for each dataset about experimental reagents (small molecule perturbagens, cells, antibodies, and proteins) and experimental and data analysis protocols.
The World Glacier Monitoring Service (WGMS) collects standardized observations on changes in mass, volume, area and length of glaciers with time (glacier fluctuations), as well as statistical information on the distribution of perennial surface ice in space (glacier inventories). Such glacier fluctuation and inventory data are high priority key variables in climate system monitoring; they form a basis for hydrological modelling with respect to possible effects of atmospheric warming, and provide fundamental information in glaciology, glacial geomorphology and quaternary geology. The highest information density is found for the Alps and Scandinavia, where long and uninterrupted records are available. As a contribution to the Global Terrestrial/Climate Observing System (GTOS, GCOS), the Division of Early Warning and Assessment and the Global Environment Outlook of UNEP, and the International Hydrological Programme of UNESCO, the WGMS collects and publishes worldwide standardized glacier data.
Junar provides a cloud-based open data platform that enables innovative organizations worldwide to quickly, easily and affordably make their data accessible to all. In just a few weeks, your initial datasets can be published, providing greater transparency, encouraging collaboration and citizen engagement, and freeing up precious staff resources.
OpenWorm aims to build the first comprehensive computational model of the Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), a microscopic roundworm. With only a thousand cells, it solves basic problems such as feeding, mate-finding and predator avoidance. Despite being extremely well studied in biology, this organism still eludes a deep, principled understanding of its biology. We are using a bottom-up approach, aimed at observing the worm behaviour emerge from a simulation of data derived from scientific experiments carried out over the past decade. To do so we are incorporating the data available in the scientific community into software models. We are engineering Geppetto and Sibernetic, open-source simulation platforms, to be able to run these different models in concert. We are also forging new collaborations with universities and research institutes to collect data that fill in the gaps All the code we produce in the OpenWorm project is Open Source and available on GitHub.
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
HITRAN is an acronym for high-resolution transmission molecular absorption database. The HITRAN compilation of the SAO (HIgh resolution TRANmission molecular absorption database) is used for predicting and simulating transmission and emission of light in atmospheres. It is the world-standard database in molecular spectroscopy. The journal article describing it is the most cited reference in the geosciences. There are presently about 5000 HITRAN users world-wide. Its associated database HITEMP (high-temperature spectroscopic absorption parameters) is accessible by the HITRAN website.
High spatial resolution, contemporary data on human population distributions are a prerequisite for the accurate measurement of the impacts of population growth, for monitoring changes and for planning interventions. The WorldPop project aims to meet these needs through the provision of detailed and open access population distribution datasets built using transparent approaches. The WorldPop project was initiated in October 2013 to combine the AfriPop, AsiaPop and AmeriPop population mapping projects. It aims to provide an open access archive of spatial demographic datasets for Central and South America, Africa and Asia to support development, disaster response and health applications. The methods used are designed with full open access and operational application in mind, using transparent, fully documented and peer-reviewed methods to produce easily updatable maps with accompanying metadata and measures of uncertainty.
TAED is a database of phylogenetically indexed gene families. It contains multiple sequence alignments from MAFFT1, maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees from PhyML2, bootstrap values for each node, dN/dS ratios for each lineage from the free ratios model in PAML3, and labels for each node of speciation or duplication from gene tree/species tree reconciliation using SoftParsMap4. The phylogenetic indexing enables simultaneous viewing of lineages with high dN/dS that occurred along the same species tree branches. Resources from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG)5, have been incorporated into the TAED analysis to detect substitutions along each branch within the phylogenetic tree and to assess selection within pathways.
The open data portal is designed to achieve the following goals: providing centralized access to information resources presented in the form of open data; creation of an information platform for interaction with the general public on the issues of the formation, publication and use of public data; formation and implementation of a unified technological policy in the field of open government data. The main suppliers of open data are public authorities of all levels of government: federal, regional and municipal. Moreover, other organizations can also serve as a supplier of open data which are interested in starting their own activities.
NASA funded OpenAltimetry facilitates the advanced discovery, processing, and visualization services for ICESat and ICESat-2 altimeter data.
BrainMaps.org, launched in May 2005, is an interactive multiresolution next-generation brain atlas that is based on over 20 million megapixels of sub-micron resolution, annotated, scanned images of serial sections of both primate and non-primate brains and that is integrated with a high-speed database for querying and retrieving data about brain structure and function over the internet. Currently featured are complete brain atlas datasets for various species, including Macaca mulatta, Chlorocebus aethiops, Felis catus, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, and Tyto alba.