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Found 10 result(s)
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The Institute of Ocean Sciences (IOS)/Ocean Sciences Division (OSD) data archive contains the holdings of oceanographic data generated by the IOS and other agencies and laboratories, including the Institute of Oceanography at the University of British Columbia and the Pacific Biological Station. The contents include data from B.C. coastal waters and inlets, B.C. continental shelf waters, open ocean North Pacific waters, Beaufort Sea and the Arctic Archipelago.
Country
The website www.geobase.ca/ closed in January 2015. All GeoBase products are available on the Open Government of Canada portal: https://open.canada.ca/en GeoBase initiative provides geospatial data of the entire Canadian landmass for government, business, and/or personal assessments of sustainable resource development, public safety, sanitation, and environmental protection. Data is available for download as ESRI Shapefile, FGDB, KML, and GML.
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OGSEarth provides geoscience data, collected by the Mines and Minerals division, which can be viewed using user-friendly geographic information programs such as Google Earth™. OSGEarth provides data on Mining claims, Geology, Index maps, Administrative boundaries and Abandoned mines.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
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Launched in November 1995, RADARSAT-1 provided Canada and the world with an operational radar satellite system capable of timely delivery of large amounts of data. Equipped with a powerful synthetic aperture radar (SAR) instrument, it acquired images of the Earth day or night, in all weather and through cloud cover, smoke and haze. RADARSAT-1 was a Canadian-led project involving the Canadian federal government, the Canadian provinces, the United States, and the private sector. It provided useful information to both commercial and scientific users in such fields as disaster management, interferometry, agriculture, cartography, hydrology, forestry, oceanography, ice studies and coastal monitoring.
Measurements Of Pollution In The Troposphere (MOPITT) was launched into sun-synchronous polar orbit on December 18, 1999, aboard TERRA, a NASA satellite orbiting 705 km above the Earth. MOPITT monitors changes in pollution patterns and the effects on Earth’s troposphere. MOPITT uses near-infrared radiation at 2.3 µm and thermal-infrared radiation at 4.7 µm to calculate atmospheric profiles of CO.
Country
The Geoscience Data Repository (GDR) is a collection of Earth Sciences Sector geoscience databases that is managed and accessed by a series of Information Services (GDRIS). This site allows you to discover, view and download information using these services. About 27 data resources are listed and many are also listed in the GeoConnections Discovery Portal.
The THEMIS mission is a five-satellite Explorer mission whose primary objective is to understand the onset and macroscale evolution of magnetospheric substorms. The five small satellites were launched together on a Delta II rocket and they carry identical sets of instruments including an electric field instrument (EFI), a flux gate magnetometer (FGM), a search coil magnetometer (SCM), a electro-static analyzer, and solid state telescopes (SST). The mission consists of several phases. In the first phase, the spacecraft will all orbit as a tight cluster in the same orbital plane with apogee at 15.4 Earth radii (RE). In the second phase, also called the Dawn Phase, the satellites will be placed in their orbits and during this time their apogees will be on the dawn side of the magnetosphere. During the third phase (also known as the Tail Science Phase) the apogees will be in the magnetotail. The fourth phase is called the Dusk Phase or Radiation Belt Science Phase, with all apogees on the dusk side. In the fifth and final phase, the apogees will shift to the sunward side (Dayside Science Phase). The satellite data will be combined with observations of the aurora from a network of 20 ground observatories across the North American continent. The THEMIS-B (THEMIS-P1) and THEMIS-C (THEMIS-P2) were repurposed to study the lunar environment in 2009. The spacecraft were renamed ARTEMIS (Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moon’s Interaction with the Sun), with the P1 and P2 designations maintained.
The Online Data Portal (ODP) is an evolving project to support collaborative river restoration projects, such as the TRRP. The goal is to provide a centralized clearing house of documents and data for program partners, stakeholders, and the public. The functionality and data holdings will continue to be expanded over the next few years. The ability to store Data Packages is new as of Fall 2011 and holdings should expand substantially in the months afterward. A project to scan many older documents also began in December 2011. Simple time-series datasets have long been stored in the ODP, but holdings of these data are likely to increase as TRRP implements an upcoming Data Management and Utility Plan. Major upgrades to the Interactive Map are expected to start in winter and spring of 2012. The long term vision is that many data resources will be accessible both by text searches and via the Interactive Map. The ODP will be available for use by other river restoration programs.