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Found 363 result(s)
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
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The Japanese Genotype-phenotype Archive (JGA) is a service for permanent archiving and sharing of all types of individual-level genetic and de-identified phenotypic data resulting from biomedical research projects. The JGA contains exclusive data collected from individuals whose consent agreements authorize data release only for specific research use or to bona fide researchers. Strict protocols govern how information is managed, stored and distributed by the JGA. Once processed, all data are encrypted. Users can contact the JGA team from here. JGA services are provided in collaboration with National Bioscience Database Center (NBDC) of Japan Science and Technology Agency.
Probe database provides a public registry of nucleic acid reagents as well as information on reagent distributors, sequence similarities and probe effectiveness. Database users have access to applications of gene expression, gene silencing and mapping, as well as reagent variation analysis and projects based on probe-generated data. The Probe database is constantly updated.
The IMPC is a confederation of international mouse phenotyping projects working towards the agreed goals of the consortium: To undertake the phenotyping of 20,000 mouse mutants over a ten year period, providing the first functional annotation of a mammalian genome. Maintain and expand a world-wide consortium of institutions with capacity and expertise to produce germ line transmission of targeted knockout mutations in embryonic stem cells for 20,000 known and predicted mouse genes. Test each mutant mouse line through a broad based primary phenotyping pipeline in all the major adult organ systems and most areas of major human disease. Through this activity and employing data annotation tools, systematically aim to discover and ascribe biological function to each gene, driving new ideas and underpinning future research into biological systems; Maintain and expand collaborative “networks” with specialist phenotyping consortia or laboratories, providing standardized secondary level phenotyping that enriches the primary dataset, and end-user, project specific tertiary level phenotyping that adds value to the mammalian gene functional annotation and fosters hypothesis driven research; and Provide a centralized data centre and portal for free, unrestricted access to primary and secondary data by the scientific community, promoting sharing of data, genotype-phenotype annotation, standard operating protocols, and the development of open source data analysis tools. Members of the IMPC may include research centers, funding organizations and corporations.
The Genome database contains annotations and analysis of eukaryotic and prokaryotic genomes, as well as tools that allow users to compare genomes and gene sequences from humans, microbes, plants, viruses and organelles. Users can browse by organism, and view genome maps and protein clusters.
In 2003, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at NIH established Data, Biosample, and Genetic Repositories to increase the impact of current and previously funded NIDDK studies by making their data and biospecimens available to the broader scientific community. These Repositories enable scientists not involved in the original study to test new hypotheses without any new data or biospecimen collection, and they provide the opportunity to pool data across several studies to increase the power of statistical analyses. In addition, most NIDDK-funded studies are collecting genetic biospecimens and carrying out high-throughput genotyping making it possible for other scientists to use Repository resources to match genotypes to phenotypes and to perform informative genetic analyses.
The NCBI database of Genotypes and Phenotypes archives and distributes the results of studies that have investigated the interaction of genotype and phenotype, including genome-wide association studies, medical sequencing, molecular diagnostic assays, and association between genotype and non-clinical traits. The database provides summaries of studies, the contents of measured variables, and original study document text. dbGaP provides two types of access for users, open and controlled. Through the controlled access, users may access individual-level data such as phenotypic data tables and genotypes.
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>>>!!!<<< 2017-06-02: We recently suffered a server failure and are working to bring the full ORegAnno website back online. In the meantime, you may download the complete database here: http://www.oreganno.org/dump/ ; Data are also available through UCSC Genome Browser (e.g., hg38 -> Regulation -> ORegAnno) https://genome.ucsc.edu/cgi-bin/hgTrackUi?hgsid=686342163_2it3aVMQVoXWn0wuCjkNOVX39wxy&c=chr1&g=oreganno >>>!!!<<< The Open REGulatory ANNOtation database (ORegAnno) is an open database for the curation of known regulatory elements from scientific literature. Annotation is collected from users worldwide for various biological assays and is automatically cross-referenced against PubMED, Entrez Gene, EnsEMBL, dbSNP, the eVOC: Cell type ontology, and the Taxonomy database, where appropriate, with information regarding the original experimentation performed (evidence). ORegAnno further provides an open validation process for all regulatory annotation in the public domain. Assigned validators receive notification of new records in the database and are able to cross-reference the citation to ensure record integrity. Validators have the ability to modify any record (deprecating the old record and creating a new one) if an error is found. Further, any contributor to the database can comment on any annotation by marking errors, or adding special reports into function as they see fit. These features of ORegAnno ensure that the collection is of the highest quality and uniquely provides a dynamic view of our changing understanding of gene regulation in the various genomes.
TRAILS is a prospective cohort study, which started in 2001 with population cohort and 2004 with a clinical cohort (CC). Since then, a group of 2500 young people from the Northern part of the Netherlands has been closely monitored in order to chart and explain their mental, physical, and social development. These TRAILS participants have been measured every two to three years, by means of questionnaires, interviews, and all kinds of tests. By now, we have collected information that spans the total period from preadolescence up until young adulthood. One of the main goals of TRAILS is to contribute to the knowledge of the development of emotional and behavioral problems and the (social) functioning of preadolescents into adulthood, their determinants, and underlying mechanisms.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
A premier source for United States cancer statistics, SEER gathers information related to incidence, prevalence, and survival from specific geographic areas that represent 28 percent of the population, as well as compiles related reports and reports on the national cancer mortality rates. Their aim is to provide information related to cancer statistics and decrease the burden of cancer in the national population. SEER has been collecting data from cancer cases since 1973.
The CDHA assists researchers to create, document, and distribute public use microdata on health and aging for secondary analysis. Major research themes include: midlife development and aging; economics of population aging; inequalities in health and aging; international comparative studies of health and aging; and the investigation of linkages between social-demographic and biomedical research in population aging. The CDHA is one of fourteen demography centers on aging sponsored by the National Institute on Aging.
NURSA began in 2002 with the objective to accrue, develop and communicate information about the nuclear receptor superfamily. Over the last ten years, NURSA has developed a website that has developed into a comprehensive source of information about nuclear receptors, and their co-regulators, ligands, and downstream targets. Through a series of integrated 'omics-scale and informatic approaches projects, NURSA has fostered a systems biology understanding of nuclear receptor function, physiology and regulation of target gene networks in vivo.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The NCI’s Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) is an online resource designed to provide the scientific community with detailed characterization of gene expression in biological tissues. By characterizing normal, pre-cancer and cancer cells, CGAP aims to improve detection, diagnosis and treatment for the patient. Moreover, CGAP provides access to cDNA clones to the research community through a variety of distributors. CGAP provides a wide range of genomic data and resources
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Curtin University has 222 data records in Research Data Australia, which cover 199 subjects areas including Applied research, EARTH SCIENCES and GEOLOGY and involve 32 group(s)
CDC.gov is the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention primary online communication channel. CDC.gov provides users with credible, reliable health information on Data and Statistics, Diseases and Conditions, Emergencies and Disasters, Environmental Health, Healthy Living, Injury, Violence and Safety,Life Stages and Populations, Travelers' Health, Workplace Safety and Health
CalSurv is a comprehensive information on West Nile virus, plague, malaria, Lyme disease, trench fever and other vectorborne diseases in California — where they are, where they’ve been, where they may be headed and what new diseases may be emerging.The CalSurv Web site serves as a portal or a single interface to all surveillance-related Web sites in California.
Content type(s)
CTD contains manually curated data describing cross-species chemical-gene/protein interactions and chemical- and gene-disease relationships. The results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying variable susceptibility and environmentally influenced diseases. These data will also provide insights into complex chemical-gene and protein interaction networks.
Content type(s)
ITER contains data in support of human health risk assessments. It is compiled by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and contains data from CDC/ATSDR, Health Canada, RIVM, U.S. EPA, IARC, NSF International and independent parties offering peer-reviewed risk values. ITER provides comparison charts of international risk assessment information and explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.