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Found 14 result(s)
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
CorrDB has data of cattle, relating to meat production, milk production, growth, health, and others. This database is designed to collect all published livestock genetic/phenotypic trait correlation data, aimed at facilitating genetic network analysis or systems biology studies.
Launched in 2000, WormBase is an international consortium of biologists and computer scientists dedicated to providing the research community with accurate, current, accessible information concerning the genetics, genomics and biology of C. elegans and some related nematodes. In addition to their curation work, all sites have ongoing programs in bioinformatics research to develop the next generations of WormBase structure, content and accessibility
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GSA is a data repository specialized for archiving raw sequence reads. It supports data generated from a variety of sequencing platforms ranging from Sanger sequencing machines to single-cell sequencing machines and provides data storing and sharing services free of charge for worldwide scientific communities. In addition to raw sequencing data, GSA also accommodates secondary analyzed files in acceptable formats (like BAM, VCF). Its user-friendly web interfaces simplify data entry and submitted data are roughly organized as two parts, viz., Metadata and File, where the former can be further assorted into BioProject, BioSample, Experiment and Run, and the latter contains raw sequence reads.
EuPathDB (formerly ApiDB) is an integrated database covering the eukaryotic pathogens in the genera Acanthamoeba, Annacaliia, Babesia, Crithidia, Cryptosporidium, Edhazardia, Eimeria, Encephalitozoon, Endotrypanum, Entamoeba, Enterocytozoon, Giardia, Gregarina, Hamiltosporidium, Leishmania, Nematocida, Neospora, Nosema, Plasmodium, Theileria, Toxoplasma, Trichomonas, Trypanosoma and Vavraia, Vittaforma). While each of these groups is supported by a taxon-specific database built upon the same infrastructure, the EuPathDB portal offers an entry point to all of these resources, and the opportunity to leverage orthology for searches across genera.
The Barcode of Life Data Systems (BOLD) provides DNA barcode data. BOLD's online workbench supports data validation, annotation, and publication for specimen, distributional, and molecular data. The platform consists of four main modules: a data portal, a database of barcode clusters, an educational portal, and a data collection workbench. BOLD is the go-to site for DNA-based identification. As the central informatics platform for DNA barcoding, BOLD plays a crucial role in assimilating and organizing data gathered by the international barcode research community. Two iBOL (International Barcode of Life) Working Groups are supporting the ongoing development of BOLD.
The NCBI Taxonomy database is a curated set of names and classifications for all of the organisms that are represented in GenBank. The EMBL and DDBJ databases, as well as GenBank, now use the NCBI Taxonomy as the standard classification for nucleotide sequences. Taxonomy Contains the names and phylogenetic lineages of more than 160,000 organisms that have molecular data in the NCBI databases. New taxa are added to the Taxonomy database as data are deposited for them. When new sequences are submitted to GenBank, the submission is checked for new organism names, which are then classified and added to the Taxonomy database.
The Ensembl project produces genome databases for vertebrates and other eukaryotic species. Ensembl is a joint project between the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI) to develop a software system that produces and maintains automatic annotation on selected genomes.The Ensembl project was started in 1999, some years before the draft human genome was completed. Even at that early stage it was clear that manual annotation of 3 billion base pairs of sequence would not be able to offer researchers timely access to the latest data. The goal of Ensembl was therefore to automatically annotate the genome, integrate this annotation with other available biological data and make all this publicly available via the web. Since the website's launch in July 2000, many more genomes have been added to Ensembl and the range of available data has also expanded to include comparative genomics, variation and regulatory data. Ensembl is a joint project between European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), an outstation of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (WTSI). Both institutes are located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, south of the city of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
The NCBI Nucleotide database collects sequences from such sources as GenBank, RefSeq, TPA, and PDB. Sequences collected relate to genome, gene, and transcript sequence data, and provide a foundation for research related to the biomedical field.