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Found 247 result(s)
Complete Genomics provides free public access to a variety of whole human genome data sets generated from Complete Genomics’ sequencing service. The research community can explore and familiarize themselves with the quality of these data sets, review the data formats provided from our sequencing service, and augment their own research with additional summaries of genomic variation across a panel of diverse individuals. The quality of these data sets is representative of what a customer can expect to receive for their own samples. This public genome repository comprises genome results from both our Standard Sequencing Service (69 standard, non-diseased samples) and the Cancer Sequencing Service (two matched tumor and normal sample pairs). In March 2013 Complete Genomics was acquired by BGI-Shenzhen , the world’s largest genomics services company. BGI is a company headquartered in Shenzhen, China that provides comprehensive sequencing and bioinformatics services for commercial science, medical, agricultural and environmental applications. Complete Genomics is now focused on building a new generation of high-throughput sequencing technology and developing new and exciting research, clinical and consumer applications.
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This DOI repository provides permanent identifiers to data sets generated by Life Science researchers active in Sweden, and for which no other suitable public repository is available. BILS is a distributed national research infrastructure supported by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) providing bioinformatics support to life science researchers in Sweden.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
The ProteomeXchange consortium has been set up to provide a single point of submission of MS proteomics data to the main existing proteomics repositories, and to encourage the data exchange between them for optimal data dissemination. Current members accepting submissions are: The PRIDE PRoteomics IDEntifications database at the European Bioinformatics Institute focusing mainly on shotgun mass spectrometry proteomics data PeptideAtlas/PASSEL focusing on SRM/MRM datasets.
MassBank of North America (MoNA) is a metadata-centric, auto-curating repository designed for efficient storage and querying of mass spectral records. It intends to serve as a the framework for a centralized, collaborative database of metabolite mass spectra, metadata and associated compounds. MoNA currently contains over 200,000 mass spectral records from experimental and in-silico libraries as well as from user contributions.
The Plasmid Information Database (PlasmID) was established in 2004 to curate, maintain, and distribute cDNA and ORF constructs for use in basic molecular biological research. The materials deposited at our facility represent the culmination of several international collaborative efforts from 2004 to present: Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston Children's Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Harvard School of Public Health, and Massachusetts General Hospital.
IEDB offers easy searching of experimental data characterizing antibody and T cell epitopes studied in humans, non-human primates, and other animal species. Epitopes involved in infectious disease, allergy, autoimmunity, and transplant are included. The IEDB also hosts tools to assist in the prediction and analysis of B cell and T cell epitopes.
The Fungal Genetics Stock Center has preserved and distributed strains of genetically characterized fungi since 1960. The collection includes over 20,000 accessioned strains of classical and genetically engineered mutants of key model, human, and plant pathogenic fungi. These materials are distributed as living stocks to researchers around the world.
The Electron Microscopy Data Bank (EMDB) is a public repository for electron microscopy density maps of macromolecular complexes and subcellular structures. It covers a variety of techniques, including single-particle analysis, electron tomography, and electron (2D) crystallography.
STOREDB is a platform for the archiving and sharing of primary data and outputs of all kinds, including epidemiological and experimental data, from research on the effects of radiation. It also provides a directory of bioresources and databases containing information and materials that investigators are willing to share. STORE supports the creation of a radiation research commons.
The HomoloGene database provides a system for the automated detection of homologs among annotated genes of genomes across multiple species. These homologs are fully documented and organized by homology group. HomoloGene processing uses proteins from input organisms to compare and sequence homologs, mapping back to corresponding DNA sequences.
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The CyberCell database (CCDB) is a comprehensive collection of detailed enzymatic, biological, chemical, genetic, and molecular biological data about E. coli (strain K12, MG1655). It is intended to provide sufficient information and querying capacity for biologists and computer scientists to use computers or detailed mathematical models to simulate all or part of a bacterial cell at a nanoscopic (10-9 m), mesoscopic (10-8 m).The CyberCell database CCDB actually consists of 4 browsable databases: 1) the main CyberCell database (CCDB - containing gene and protein information), 2) the 3D structure database (CC3D – containing information for structural proteomics), 3) the RNA database (CCRD – containing tRNA and rRNA information), and 4) the metabolite database (CCMD – containing metabolite information). Each of these databases is accessible through hyperlinked buttons located at the top of the CCDB homepage. All CCDB sub-databases are fully web enabled, permitting a wide variety of interactive browsing, search and display operations. and microscopic (10-6 m) level.
BioMagResBank (BMRB) is the publicly-accessible depository for NMR results from peptides, proteins, and nucleic acids recognized by the International Society of Magnetic Resonance and by the IUPAC-IUBMB-IUPAB Inter-Union Task Group on the Standardization of Data Bases of Protein and Nucleic Acid Structures Determined by NMR Spectroscopy. In addition, BMRB provides reference information and maintains a collection of NMR pulse sequences and computer software for biomolecular NMR
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The Leipzig Health Atlas (LHA) is an alliance of medical ontologists, medical systems biologists and clinical trials groups to design and implement a multi-functional and quality-assured atlas. It provides models, data and metadata on specific use cases from medical research projects from the partner institutions.
The Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database provides access to information about transmembrane proteins that exist under different conformations, with three primary subfamilies: the cys-loop superfamily, the ATP gated channels superfamily, and the glutamate activated cationic channels superfamily.**The development of the Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database was started in 1994, as part of Le Novère's work on the phylogeny of those receptors' subunits. It grew into a serious data resource, that served the community at large. However, it is not actively maintained anymore. In addition, bioinformatics technology evolved a lot over the last two decades, so that scientists can now generate quickly customised databases from trustworthy primary data resources. Therefore, we decided to officialy freeze the data resource. The resource will not disappear, and all the information and links will stay there. But people should not consider it as an up-to-date trustable resource.**
BioVeL is a virtual e-laboratory that supports research on biodiversity issues using large amounts of data from cross-disciplinary sources. BioVeL supports the development and use of workflows to process data. It offers the possibility to either use already made workflows or create own. BioVeL workflows are stored in MyExperiment - Biovel Group http://www.myexperiment.org/groups/643/content. They are underpinned by a range of analytical and data processing functions (generally provided as Web Services or R scripts) to support common biodiversity analysis tasks. You can find the Web Services catalogued in the BiodiversityCatalogue.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
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Background: Many studies have been conducted to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) in dairy cattle. However, these studies are diverse in terms of their differing resource populations, marker maps, phenotypes, etc, and one of the challenges is to be able to synthesise this diverse information. This web page has been constructed to provide an accessible database of studies, providing a summary of each study, facilitating an easier comparison across studies. However, it also highlights the need for uniform reporting of results of studies, to facilitate more direct comparisons being made. Description: Studies recorded in this database include complete and partial genome scans, single chromosome scans, as well as fine mapping studies, and contain all known reports that were published in peer-reviewed journals and readily available conference proceedings, initially up to April 2005. However, this data base is being added to, as indicated by the last web update. Note that some duplication of results will occur, in that there may be a number of reports on the same resource population, but utilising different marker densities or different statistical methodologies. The traits recorded in this map are milk yield, milk composition (protein yield, protein %, fat yield, fat %), and somatic cell score (SCS).
The PhenoGen website shares experimental data with a worldwide community of investigators and provides a flexible, integrated, multi-resolution repository of neuroscience transcriptomic genetic data for collaborative research on genomic disorders.
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The Canadian Poisonous Plants Information System presents data on plants that cause poisoning in livestock, pets, and humans. The plants include native, introduced, and cultivated outdoor plants as well as indoor plants that are found in Canada. Some food and herbal plants that may cause potential poisoning problems are also included.
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The Toxin and Toxin Target Database is a unique bioinformatics resource that combines detailed toxin data with comprehensive toxin target information. The focus of the T3DB is on providing mechanisms of toxicity and target proteins for each toxin. This dual nature of the T3DB, in which toxin and toxin target records are interactively linked in both directions, makes it unique from existing databases.
Collection of various motion capture recordings (walking, dancing, sports, and others) performed by over 140 subjects. The database contains free motions which you can download and use. There is a zip file of all asf/amc's on the FAQs page.