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Found 333 result(s)
By stimulating inspiring research and producing innovative tools, Huygens ING intends to open up old and inaccessible sources, and to understand them better. Huygens ING’s focus is on Digital Humanities, History, History of Science, and Textual Scholarship. Huygens ING pursues research in the fields of History, Literary Studies, the History of Science and Digital Humanities. Huygens ING aims to publish digital sources and data responsibly and with care. Innovative tools are made as widely available as possible. We strive to share the available knowledge at the institute with both academic peers and the wider public.
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National Data Repository (NDR) is a reliable and integrated data repository of Exploration and Production (E&P) data of Indian sedimentary basins. It offers a unique platform to all concerns of E&P with provisions for seamless access to reliable geo-scientific data for India. Streamlining all associated procedures, policies and workflows pertaining to data submission, data management, data retrieval for all concerned pertaining to government agencies, academia and research communities with restrictions. NDR is owned by the Government of India, hosted at Directorate General of Hydrocarbons (DGH), Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (MoPNG). Objectively it operates with geological data, petrophysical data, natural gas, seismic data, well & log data, spatial data, Reservoir data, Gravity & Magnetic data. NDR maintains and preserve hydrocarbon exploration & production data in a standard and reusable manner, but can't made available to entitled users freely. One cannot get access independently.
ePrints Soton is the University's Research Repository. It contains journal articles, books, PhD theses, conference papers, data, reports, working papers, art exhibitions and more. Where possible, journal articles and conference proceedings are uploaded into ePrints and made open access.
Content type(s)
RELMIN collects, studies and publishes legal texts defining the status of religious minorities in medieval Europe. The corpus of texts is rich and varied, spanning ten centuries over a broad geographical area; these texts, in Latin, Arabic, Greek, Hebrew and Aramaic (and also in Medieval Spanish, Portuguese, and other European vernaculars), are dispersed in libraries and archives across Europe. The texts are now gathered in the RELMIN Database in their original language, with translations and commentaries. They are made available to scholars, students and citizens at large. Access is unlimited, free and perennial. and to contribute to the work of compilation. RELMIN is is buil ding a digital database of legal, judicial and normative sources defining the status of religious minorities from the 5th to the 15th century.
The POES satellite system offers the advantage of daily global coverage, by making nearly polar orbits 14 times per day approximately 520 miles above the surface of the Earth. The Earth's rotation allows the satellite to see a different view with each orbit, and each satellite provides two complete views of weather around the world each day. NOAA partners with the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) to constantly operate two polar-orbiting satellites – one POES and one European polar-orbiting satellite called Metop. NOAA's Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES) carry a suite of instruments that measure the flux of energetic ions and electrons at the altitude of the satellite. This environment varies as a result of solar and geomagnetic activity. Beginning with the NOAA-15 satellite, an upgraded version of the Space Environment Monitor (SEM-2) has been flown.
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The Taenia solium genome project is a whole genome sequencing project of the parasite Taenia solium, the causal agent of human and porcine cysticercosis; a disease that is still a public health problem of relevance in Mexico. It is being carried out by a consortium of scientists belonging to diverse institutions of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM, the National Autonomous University of Mexico).
Genome track alignments using GBrowse on this site are featured with: (1) Annotated and predicted genes and transcripts; (2) QTL / SNP Association tracks; (3) OMIA genes; (4) Various SNP Chip tracks; (5) Other mapping fetures or elements that are available.
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The MyTARDIS repository at ANSTO is used to: * Store metadata for all experiments conducted at ANSTO * Provide access and download of metadata and data to authorised users of experiments * Provide search, access and download of public metadata and data to the general scientific community
Here you can find out more about Lancaster’s world-class research activities, view details of publications, outputs and awards and make contact with our researchers.
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Various information, such as xylarium data with wood specimens collected since 1944, atmospheric observation data using the MU radar and other instruments, space-plasma data observed with GEOTAIL satellite, are now combined as Database of Humanosphere and served for public use. Proposals for scientific and technological use are always welcome.
The Observatory for Environment Research « Experimental Tropical Watersheds » (SO BVET) is INSU-labeled. It is a monitoring tool that aims to increase our knowledge regarding the continental water and biogeochemical cycles and the dynamics of weathering processes in tropical environments. It is also dedicated to the study of anthropogenic impacts on the natural environment. These goals are achieve by the combined use of hydrological, geophysical, mineralogical, geochemical methods and modeling.
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CCCma has developed a number of climate models. These are used to study climate change and variability, and to understand the various processes which govern the climate system. They are also used to make quantitative projections of future long-term climate change (given various greenhouse gas and aerosol forcing scenarios), and increasingly to make initialized climate predictions on time scales ranging from seasons to decades. A brief description of these models and their corresponding references can be found: http://ec.gc.ca/ccmac-cccma/default.asp?lang=En&n=4A642EDE-1
The UCSD Signaling Gateway Molecule Pages provide essential information on over thousands of proteins involved in cellular signaling. Each Molecule Page contains regularly updated information derived from public data sources as well as sequence analysis, references and links to other databases.
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CTD contains manually curated data describing cross-species chemical-gene/protein interactions and chemical- and gene-disease relationships. The results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying variable susceptibility and environmentally influenced diseases. These data will also provide insights into complex chemical-gene and protein interaction networks.
Content type(s)
ITER contains data in support of human health risk assessments. It is compiled by Toxicology Excellence for Risk Assessment (TERA) and contains data from CDC/ATSDR, Health Canada, RIVM, U.S. EPA, IARC, NSF International and independent parties offering peer-reviewed risk values. ITER provides comparison charts of international risk assessment information and explains differences in risk values derived by different organizations.
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In a changing climate, water raises increasingly complex challenges: concerning its quantity, quality, availability, allocation, use and significance as a habitat, resource and cultural medium. Dharmae, a ‘Data Hub of Australian Research on Marine and Aquatic Ecocultures’ brings together multi-disciplinary research data relating to water in all these forms. The term “ecoculture” guides the development of this collection and its approach to data discovery. Ecoculture recognizes that, since nature and culture are inextricably linked, there is a corresponding need for greater interconnectedness of the different knowledge systems applied to them.
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This study assessed differences in avian biodiversity across different forest age-classes, including mature stands (> 100 years), in a managed, mixed-species eucalypt forest located in Gippsland, south-eastern Australia. Avian surveys and detailed habitat measurements were initially carried out in 50 two hectare stands ranging in age from 100 years. Extensive wildfire which occurred during the study reduced the number of sites to 28 (seven in each of four age classes) upon which analyses and inferences were made. Mature vegetation (> 100 years) had the greatest richness, abundance and biomass of birds. Key ecological resources, such as tree-hollows for nesting, generally occurred mostly in stands > 60 years. There were quantum increases in all measures of avian biodiversity in mature stands (> 100 years). The visualisation of the survey data is part of an interoperable web-GIS maintained by the Centre for eResearch and Digital Innovation (CeRDI) at Federation University Australia (FedUni).
The Database contains all publicly available HMS LINCS datasets and information for each dataset about experimental reagents (small molecule perturbagens, cells, antibodies, and proteins) and experimental and data analysis protocols.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS), established in 1988, is a systematic longitudinal study enrolling HIV-infected individuals in Switzerland. It is a collaboration of all Swiss University Hospital infectious disease outpatient clinics, two large cantonal hospitals, all with affiliated laboratories, and with affiliated smaller hospitals and private physicians carrying for HIV patients. The Swiss Mother and Child HIV Cohort Study (MoCHiV) is integrated into the SHCS. It aims at preventing mother to child transmission and enrolls HIV-infected pregnant women and their children. The SHCS involves practically all researchers being active in patient-oriented HIV research in Switzerland. The clinics can delegate recruitment of participants and follow-up visits to other outpatient clinics or to specialized private physicians, provided that the requirements of the protocol can be entirely fulfilled and controlled. The laboratories can contract other laboratories for some of the analyses.
Cell phones have become an important platform for the understanding of social dynamics and influence, because of their pervasiveness, sensing capabilities, and computational power. Many applications have emerged in recent years in mobile health, mobile banking, location based services, media democracy, and social movements. With these new capabilities, we can potentially be able to identify exact points and times of infection for diseases, determine who most influences us to gain weight or become healthier, know exactly how information flows among employees and productivity emerges in our work spaces, and understand how rumors spread. In an attempt to address these challenges, we release several mobile data sets here in "Reality Commons" that contain the dynamics of several communities of about 100 people each. We invite researchers to propose and submit their own applications of the data to demonstrate the scientific and business values of these data sets, suggest how to meaningfully extend these experiments to larger populations, and develop the math that fits agent-based models or systems dynamics models to larger populations. These data sets were collected with tools developed in the MIT Human Dynamics Lab and are now available as open source projects or at cost.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.