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Found 22 result(s)
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
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A human interactome map. The sequencing of the human genome has provided a surprisingly small number of genes, indicating that the complex organization of life is not reflected in the gene number but, rather, in the gene products – that is, in the proteins. These macromolecules regulate the vast majority of cellular processes by their ability to communicate with each other and to assemble into larger functional units. Therefore, the systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions is fundamental for the understanding of protein function, cellular processes and, ultimately, the complexity of life. Moreover, interactome maps are particularly needed to link new proteins to disease pathways and the identification of novel drug targets.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and nucleic acids. These are the molecules of life that are found in all organisms including bacteria, yeast, plants, flies, other animals, and humans. Understanding the shape of a molecule helps to understand how it works. This knowledge can be used to help deduce a structure's role in human health and disease, and in drug development. The structures in the archive range from tiny proteins and bits of DNA to complex molecular machines like the ribosome.
Human Proteinpedia is a community portal for sharing and integration of human protein data. This is a joint project between Pandey at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. This portal allows research laboratories around the world to contribute and maintain protein annotations. Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) integrates data, that is deposited in Human Proteinpedia along with the existing literature curated information in the context of an individual protein. All the public data contributed to Human Proteinpedia can be queried, viewed and downloaded. Data pertaining to post-translational modifications, protein interactions, tissue expression, expression in cell lines, subcellular localization and enzyme substrate relationships may be deposited.
Explore, search, and download data and metadata from your experiments and from public Open Data. The ESRF data repository is intended to store and archive data from photon science experiments done at the ESRF and to store digital material like documents and scientific results which need a DOI and long term preservation. Data are made public after an embargo period of maximum 3 years.
The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is an archive of experimentally determined three-dimensional structures of biological macromolecules that serves a global community of researchers, educators, and students. The data contained in the archive include atomic coordinates, crystallographic structure factors and NMR experimental data. Aside from coordinates, each deposition also includes the names of molecules, primary and secondary structure information, sequence database references, where appropriate, and ligand and biological assembly information, details about data collection and structure solution, and bibliographic citations. The Worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) consists of organizations that act as deposition, data processing and distribution centers for PDB data. Members are: RCSB PDB (USA), PDBe (Europe) and PDBj (Japan), and BMRB (USA). The wwPDB's mission is to maintain a single PDB archive of macromolecular structural data that is freely and publicly available to the global community.
PDBj (Protein Data Bank Japan) provides a centralized PDB archive of macromolecular structures, integrated tools for data retrieval, visualization, and functional characterization. PDBj is supported by JST-NBDC and Osaka University.
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The Swedish Human Protein Atlas project has been set up to allow for a systematic exploration of the human proteome using Antibody-Based Proteomics. This is accomplished by combining high-throughput generation of affinity-purified antibodies with protein profiling in a multitude of tissues and cells assembled in tissue microarrays. Confocal microscopy analysis using human cell lines is performed for more detailed protein localization. The program hosts the Human Protein Atlas portal with expression profiles of human proteins in tissues and cells. The main objective of the resource centre is to produce specific antibodies to human target proteins using a high-throughput production method involving the cloning and protein expression of Protein Epitope Signature Tags (PrESTs). After purification, the antibodies are used to study expression profiles in cells and tissues and for functional analysis of the corresponding proteins in a wide range of platforms.
The Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC) is a coalition of investigators seeking to aggregate and harmonize exome sequencing data from a wide variety of large-scale sequencing projects, and to make summary data available for the wider scientific community. The data set provided on this website spans 60,706 unrelated individuals sequenced as part of various disease-specific and population genetic studies.
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BACTIBASE contains calculated or predicted physicochemical properties of bacteriocins produced by both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The information in this database is very easy to extract and allows rapid prediction of relationships structure/function and target organisms of these peptides and therefore better exploitation of their biological activity in both the medical and food sectors.
The Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database provides access to information about transmembrane proteins that exist under different conformations, with three primary subfamilies: the cys-loop superfamily, the ATP gated channels superfamily, and the glutamate activated cationic channels superfamily.**The development of the Ligand-Gated Ion Channel database was started in 1994, as part of Le Novère's work on the phylogeny of those receptors' subunits. It grew into a serious data resource, that served the community at large. However, it is not actively maintained anymore. In addition, bioinformatics technology evolved a lot over the last two decades, so that scientists can now generate quickly customised databases from trustworthy primary data resources. Therefore, we decided to officialy freeze the data resource. The resource will not disappear, and all the information and links will stay there. But people should not consider it as an up-to-date trustable resource.**
Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) has been established by a team of biologists, bioinformaticists and software engineers. This is a joint project between the PandeyLab at Johns Hopkins University, and Institute of Bioinformatics, Bangalore. HPRD is a definitive repository of human proteins. This database should serve as a ready reckoner for researchers in their quest for drug discovery, identification of disease markers and promote biomedical research in general. Human Proteinpedia (www.humanproteinpedia.org) is its associated data portal.
MycoBank is an on-line database aimed as a service to the mycological and scientific society by documenting mycological nomenclatural novelties (new names and combinations) and associated data, for example descriptions and illustrations. The nomenclatural novelties will each be allocated a unique MycoBank number that can be cited in the publication where the nomenclatural novelty is introduced. These numbers will also be used by the nomenclatural database Index Fungorum, with which MycoBank is associated.
The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) is designed to be a repository for all types of sequence and genotype experiments, including case-control, population, and family studies. We will include SNP and CNV genotypes from array based methods and genotyping done with re-sequencing methods. The EGA will serve as a permanent archive that will archive several levels of data including the raw data (which could, for example, be re-analysed in the future by other algorithms) as well as the genotype calls provided by the submitters. We are developing data mining and access tools for the database. For controlled access data, the EGA will provide the necessary security required to control access, and maintain patient confidentiality, while providing access to those researchers and clinicians authorised to view the data. In all cases, data access decisions will be made by the appropriate data access-granting organisation (DAO) and not by the EGA. The DAO will normally be the same organisation that approved and monitored the initial study protocol or a designate of this approving organisation. The European Genome-phenome Archive (EGA) allows you to explore datasets from genomic studies, provided by a range of data providers. Access to datasets must be approved by the specified Data Access Committee (DAC).
The FAIRDOMHub is built upon the SEEK software suite, which is an open source web platform for sharing scientific research assets, processes and outcomes. FAIRDOM (Web Site) will establish a support and service network for European Systems Biology. It will serve projects in standardizing, managing and disseminating data and models in a FAIR manner: Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable. FAIRDOM is an initiative to develop a community, and establish an internationally sustained Data and Model Management service to the European Systems Biology community. FAIRDOM is a joint action of ERA-Net EraSysAPP and European Research Infrastructure ISBE.
The Australian Drosophila Ecology and Evolution Resource (ADEER) from the Hoffmann lab and other contributors is a nationally significant life science collection. The Drosophila Clinal Data Collection contains data on populations along the eastern coast of Australia. It remains an excellent resource for understanding past and future evolutionary responses to climate change. The Drosophila Genomic Data Collection hosts Drosophila genomes sequenced as part of the Genomic Basis for Adaptation to Climate Change Project. 23 genomes have been sequenced as part of this project. Currently assemblies and annotations are available for Drosophila birchii, D. bunnanda, D. hydei, and D. repleta. The Drosophila Species Distribution Data Collection contains distribution data of nine drosophilid species that have been collected in Australia by the Hoffmann lab and other research groups between 1924 and 2005. More than 300 drosophilid species have been identified in the tropical and temperate forests located on the east coast of Australia. Many species are restricted to the tropics, a few are temperate specialists, and some have broad distributions across climatic regions. Their varied distribution along the tropical - temperate cline provide a powerful tool for studying climate adaptation and species distribution limits.
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The mission of the platform is to enable access for academic projects towards experiments in high-throughput without loss of IP and on a cost basis, which does not restrict access towards HTS usage. The FMP hosts the central open access technology platform of EU-OPENSCREEN, the ChemBioNet and theHelmholtz-Initiative für Wirkstoffforschung, the Screening Unit. The Unit serves for systematic screening of large compound or genome-wide RNAi libraries with state-of-the-art equipment like automated microscopes and microfluidic systems. The Screening Unit is part of the Chemical Biology Platform of the FMP also supported by the MDC.
SimTK is a free project-hosting platform for the biomedical computation community that enables researchers to easily share their software, data, and models and provides the infrastructure so they can support and grow a community around their projects. It has over 62,000 members, hosts more than 960 projects from researchers around the world, and has had more than 500,000 files downloaded from it. Individuals have created SimTK projects to meet publisher and funding agencies’ software and data sharing requirements, run scientific challenges, create a collection of their community’s resources, and much more.
This is CSDB version 1 merged from Bacterial (BCSDB) and Plant&Fungal (PFCSDB) databases. This database aims at provision of structural, bibliographic, taxonomic, NMR spectroscopic and other information on glycan and glycoconjugate structures of prokaryotic, plant and fungal origin. It has been merged from the Bacterial and Plant&Fungal Carbohydrate Structure Databases (BCSDB+PFCSDB). The key points of this service are: High coverage. The coverage for bacteria (up to 2016) and archaea (up to 2016) is above 80%. Similar coverage for plants and fungi is expected in the future. The database is close to complete up to 1998 for plants, and up to 2006 for fungi. Data quality. High data quality is achieved by manual curation using original publications which is assisted by multiple automatic procedures for error control. Errors present in publications are reported and corrected, when possible. Data from other databases are verified on import. Detailed annotations. Structural data are supplied with extended bibliography, assigned NMR spectra, taxon identification including strains and serogroups, and other information if available in the original publication. Services. CSDB serves as a platform for a number of computational services tuned for glycobiology, such as NMR simulation, automated structure elucidation, taxon clustering, 3D molecular modeling, statistical processing of data etc. Integration. CSDB is cross-linked to other glycoinformatics projects and NCBI databases. The data are exportable in various formats, including most widespread encoding schemes and records using GlycoRDF ontology. Free web access. Users can access the database for free via its web interface (see Help). The main source of data is retrospective literature analysis. About 20% of data were imported from CCSD (Carbbank, University of Georgia, Athens; structures published before 1996) with subsequent manual curation and approval. The current coverage is displayed in red on the top of the left menu. The time lag between the publication of new data and their deposition into CSDB is ca. 1 year. In the scope of bacterial carbohydrates, CSDB covers nearly all structures of this origin published up to 2016. Prokaryotic, plant and fungal means that a glycan was found in the organism(s) belonging to these taxonomic domains or was obtained by modification of those found in them. Carbohydrate means a structure composed of any residues linked by glycosidic, ester, amidic, ketal, phospho- or sulpho-diester bonds in which at least one residue is a sugar or its derivative.