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Found 231 result(s)
The Polinsky Language Sciences Lab at Harvard University is a linguistics lab that examines questions of language structure and its effect on the ways in which people use and process language in real time. We engage in linguistic and interdisciplinary research projects ourselves; offer linguistic research capabilities for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and visitors; and build relationships with the linguistic communities in which we do our research. We are interested in a broad range of issues pertaining to syntax, interfaces, and cross-linguistic variation. We place a particular emphasis on novel experimental evidence that facilitates the construction of linguistic theory. We have a strong cross-linguistic focus, drawing upon English, Russian, Chinese, Korean, Mayan languages, Basque, Austronesian languages, languages of the Caucasus, and others. We believe that challenging existing theories with data from as broad a range of languages as possible is a crucial component of the successful development of linguistic theory. We investigate both fluent speakers and heritage speakers—those who grew up hearing or speaking a particular language but who are now more fluent in a different, societally dominant language. Heritage languages, a novel field of linguistic inquiry, are important because they provide new insights into processes of linguistic development and attrition in general, thus increasing our understanding of the human capacity to maintain and acquire language. Understanding language use and processing in real time and how children acquire language helps us improve language study and pedagogy, which in turn improves communication across the globe. Although our lab does not specialize in language acquisition, we have conducted some studies of acquisition of lesser-studied languages and heritage languages, with the purpose of comparing heritage speakers to adults.
The Radio Telescope Data Center (RTDC) reduces, archives, and makes available on its web site data from SMA and the CfA Millimeter-wave Telescope. The whole-Galaxy CO survey presented in Dame et al. (2001) is a composite of 37 separate surveys. The data from most of these surveys can be accessed. Larger composites of these surveys are available separately.
The Bremen Core Repository - BCR, for International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Integrated Ocean Discovery Program (IODP), Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), and Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) cores from the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and Black Seas and Arctic Ocean is operated at University of Bremen within the framework of the German participation in IODP. It is one of three IODP repositories (beside Gulf Coast Repository (GCR) in College Station, TX, and Kochi Core Center (KCC), Japan). One of the scientific goals of IODP is to research the deep biosphere and the subseafloor ocean. IODP has deep-frozen microbiological samples from the subseafloor available for interested researchers and will continue to collect and preserve geomicrobiology samples for future research.
SHARE - Stations at High Altitude for Research on the Environment - is an integrated Project for environmental monitoring and research in the mountain areas of Europe, Asia, Africa and South America responding to the call for improving environmental research and policies for adaptation to the effects of climate changes, as requested by International and Intergovernmental institutions.
The Brain Transcriptome Database (BrainTx) project aims to create an integrated platform to visualize and analyze our original transcriptome data and publicly accessible transcriptome data related to the genetics that underlie the development, function, and dysfunction stages and states of the brain.
Open access to macromolecular X-ray diffraction and MicroED datasets. The repository complements the Worldwide Protein Data Bank. SBDG also hosts reference collection of biomedical datasets contributed by members of SBGrid, Harvard and pilot communities.
In order to meet the needs of research data management for Peking University. The PKU library cooperate with the NSFC-PKU data center for management science, PKU science and research department, PKU social sciences department to jointly launch the Peking University Open Research Data Platform. PKU Open research data provides preservation, management and distribution services for research data. It encourage data owner to share data and data users to reuse data.
The Global Carbon Atlas is an online platform to explore, visualize and interpret global and regional carbon data arising from both human activities and natural processes. The graphics and data sources are made available in the belief that their wide dissemination will lead to new knowledge and better-informed decisions to limit and cope with human-induced climate change. The Global Carbon Atlas is a community effort under the umbrella of the Global Carbon Project based on the contributions of many research institutions and individual scientists around the world who make available observations, models, and interpretation skills.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
GeneCards is a searchable, integrative database that provides comprehensive, user-friendly information on all annotated and predicted human genes. It automatically integrates gene-centric data from ~125 web sources, including genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, genetic, clinical and functional information.
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The IDR makes datasets that have never previously been accessible publicly available, allowing the community to search, view, mine and even process and analyze large, complex, multidimensional life sciences image data. Sharing data promotes the validation of experimental methods and scientific conclusions, the comparison with new data obtained by the global scientific community, and enables data reuse by developers of new analysis and processing tools.
DR-NTU (Data) is the institutional open access research data repository for Nanyang Technological University (NTU). NTU researchers are encouraged to use DR-NTU (Data) to deposit, publish and archive their final research data in order to make their research data discoverable, accessible and reusable.
The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a radio telescope with around one million square metres of collecting area, designed to study the Universe with unprecedented speed and sensitivity. The SKA is not a single telescope, but a collection of various types of antennas, called an array, to be spread over long distances. The SKA will be used to answer fundamental questions of science and about the laws of nature, such as: how did the Universe, and the stars and galaxies contained in it, form and evolve? Was Einstein’s theory of relativity correct? What is the nature of ‘dark matter’ and ‘dark energy’? What is the origin of cosmic magnetism? Is there life somewhere else in the Universe?
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The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) is the nation's record keeper. Of all documents and materials created in the course of business conducted by the United States Federal government, only 1%-3% are so important for legal or historical reasons that they are kept by us forever. Those valuable records are preserved and are available to you, whether you want to see if they contain clues about your family’s history, need to prove a veteran’s military service, or are researching an historical topic that interests you.
The Earth Orientation Centre is responsible for monitoring of long-term earth orientation parameters, publications for time dissemination and leap second announcements.
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
The EPN (or EUREF Permanent Network) is a voluntary organization of several European agencies and universities that pool resources and permanent GNSS station data to generate precise GNSS products. The EPN has been created under the umbrella of the International Association Geodesy and more precisely by its sub-commission EUREF. The European Terrestrial Reference System 89 (ETRS89) is used as the standard precise GPS coordinate system throughout Europe. Supported by EuroGeographics and endorsed by the EU, this reference system forms the backbone for all geographic and geodynamic projects on the European territory both on a national as on an international level.
IBICT is providing a research data repository that takes care of long-term preservation and archiving of good practices, so that researchers can share, maintain control and get recognition for your data. The repository supports research data sharing with Quote persistent data, allowing them to be played. The Dataverse is a large open data repository of all disciplines, created by the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University. IBICT the Dataverse repository provides a means available for free to deposit and find specific data sets stored by employees of the institutions participating in the Cariniana network.
The International Center for Global Earth Models collects and distributes historical and actual global gravity field models of the Earth and offers calculation service for derived quantities. In particular the tasks include: collecting and archiving of all existing global gravity field models, web interface for getting access to global gravity field models, web based visualization of the gravity field models their differences and their time variation, web based service for calculating different functionals of the gravity field models, web site for tutorials on spherical harmonics and the theory of the calculation service. As new service since 2016, ICGEM is providing a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) for the data set of the model (the coefficients).
The Biodiversity Research Program (PPBio) was created in 2004 with the aims of furthering biodiversity studies in Brazil, decentralizing scientific production from already-developed academic centers, integrating research activities and disseminating results across a variety of purposes, including environmental management and education. PPBio contributes its data to the DataONE network as a member node: https://search.dataone.org/#profile/PPBIO
The Portal aims to serve as a unique access point to timely, comprehensive migration statistics and reliable information about migration data globally. The site is designed to help policy makers, national statistics officers, journalists and the general public interested in the field of migration to navigate the increasingly complex landscape of international migration data, currently scattered across different organisations and agencies. Especially in critical times, such as those faced today, it is essential to ensure that responses to migration are based on sound facts and accurate analysis. By making the evidence about migration issues accessible and easy to understand, the Portal aims to contribute to a more informed public debate. The Portal was launched in December 2017 and is managed and developed by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC), with the guidance of its Advisory Board, and was supported in its conception by the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU). The Portal is supported financially by the Governments of Germany, the United States of America and the UK Department for International Development (DFID).
In keeping with the open data policies of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Cereal Systems Initiative for South Asia (CSISA) has launched the CSISA Data Repository to ensure public accessibility to key data sets, including crop cut data- directly observed, crop yield estimates, on-station and on-farm research trial data and socioeconomic surveys. CSISA is a science-driven and impact-oriented regional initiative for increasing the productivity of cereal-based cropping systems in Bangladesh, India and Nepal, thus improving food security and farmers’ livelihoods. CSISA generates data that is of value and interest to a diverse audience of researchers, policymakers and the public. CSISA’s data repository is hosted on Dataverse, an open source web application developed at Harvard University to share, preserve, cite, explore and analyze research data. CSISA’s repository contains rich datasets, including on-station trial data from 2009–17 about crop and resource management practices for sustainable future cereal-based cropping systems. Collection of this data occurred during the long-term, on-station research trials conducted at the Indian Council of Agricultural Research – Research Complex for the Eastern Region in Bihar, India. The data include information on agronomic management for the sustainable intensification of cropping systems, mechanization, diversification, futuristic approaches to sustainable intensification, long-term effects of conservation agriculture practices on soil health and the pest spectrum. Additional trial data in the repository includes nutrient omission plot technique trials from Bihar, eastern Uttar Pradesh and Odisha, India, covering 2012–15, which help determine the indigenous nutrient supplying ability of the soil. This data helps develop precision nutrient management approaches that would be most effective in different types of soils. CSISA’s most popular dataset thus far includes crop cut data on maize in Odisha, India and rice in Nepal. Crop cut datasets provide ground-truthed yield estimates, as well as valuable information on relevant agronomic and socioeconomic practices affecting production practices and yield. A variety of research data on wheat systems are also available from Bangladesh and India. Additional crop cut data will also be coming online soon. Cropping system-related data and socioeconomic data are in the repository, some of which are cross-listed with a Dataverse run by the International Food Policy Research Institute. The socioeconomic datasets contain baseline information that is crucial for technology targeting, as well as to assess the adoption and performance of CSISA-supported technologies under smallholder farmers’ constrained conditions, representing the ultimate litmus test of their potential for change at scale. Other highly interesting datasets include farm composition and productive trajectory information, based on a 20-year panel dataset, and numerous wheat crop cut and maize nutrient omission trial data from across Bangladesh.