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Found 282 result(s)
Content type(s)
BioSamples stores and supplies descriptions and metadata about biological samples used in research and development by academia and industry. Samples are either 'reference' samples (e.g. from 1000 Genomes, HipSci, FAANG) or have been used in an assay database such as the European Nucleotide Archive (ENA) or ArrayExpress.
M-CSA is a database of enzyme reaction mechanisms. It provides annotation on the protein, catalytic residues, cofactors, and the reaction mechanisms of hundreds of enzymes. There are two kinds of entries in M-CSA. 'Detailed mechanism' entries are more complete and show the individual chemical steps of the mechanism as schemes with electron flow arrows. 'Catalytic Site' entries annotate the catalytic residues necessary for the reaction, but do not show the mechanism. The M-CSA (Mechanism and Catalytic Site Atlas) represents a unified resource that combines the data in both MACiE and the CSA
Antarctic marine and terrestrial biodiversity data is widely scattered, patchy and often not readily accessible. In many cases the data is in danger of being irretrievably lost. Biodiversity.aq establishes and supports a distributed system of interoperable databases, giving easy access through a single internet portal to a set of resources relevant to research, conservation and management pertaining to Antarctic biodiversity. biodiversity.aq provides access to both marine and terrestrial Antarctic biodiversity data.
This site offers an enormous collection of photographs of wild species and natural history objects. It covers most groups of organisms with the exception of birds and other vertebrates. The photographs are presented to illustrate biodiversity and as an aid to identification. The criterion for inclusion of a species is that it must have been, or might be expected to be, found in Britain or Ireland. BioImages follows the biological classification. Biota is a hierarchical system with species grouped in genera, genera in families, families in orders and so on up to kingdoms and superkingdoms. The datasets are linked to bioinfo: food webs and species interactions in the Biodiversity of UK and Ireland.
The Oxford University Research Archive (ORA) serves as an institutional repository for the University of Oxford and is home to the scholarly research output of its members. ORA also is the home of Oxford digital theses. ORA is a permanant and secure archive of the University which preserves an array of research publications, journal articles, conference papers, working papers, theses, reports, book sections and more. Unpublished academic work is also deposited into ORA, maximising the University's research output. ORA hollds publications, theses and research data.
Science Photo Library (SPL) provides creative professionals with striking specialist imagery, unrivalled in quality, accuracy and depth of information. We have more than 600,000 images and 40,000 clips to choose from, with hundreds of new submissions uploaded to the website each week.
Established in 1965, the CSD is the world’s repository for small-molecule organic and metal-organic crystal structures. Containing the results of over one million x-ray and neutron diffraction analyses this unique database of accurate 3D structures has become an essential resource to scientists around the world. The CSD records bibliographic, chemical and crystallographic information for:organic molecules, metal-organic compounds whose 3D structures have been determined using X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction. The CSD records results of: single crystal studies, powder diffraction studies which yield 3D atomic coordinate data for at least all non-H atoms. In some cases the CCDC is unable to obtain coordinates, and incomplete entries are archived to the CSD. The CSD includes crystal structure data arising from: publications in the open literature and Private Communications to the CSD (via direct data deposition). The CSD contains directly deposited data that are not available anywhere else, known as CSD Communications.
The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is a charitably funded genomic research centre located in Hinxton, nine miles south of Cambridge in the UK. We study diseases that have an impact on health globally by investigating genomes. Building on our past achievements and based on priorities that exploit the unique expertise of our Faculty of researchers, we will lead global efforts to understand the biology of genomes. We are convinced of the importance of making this research available and accessible for all audiences. reduce global health burdens.
DataStorre is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Stirling. University of Stirling researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
Here you can find out more about Lancaster’s world-class research activities, view details of publications, outputs and awards and make contact with our researchers.
The Twenty-07 Study was set up in 1986 in order to investigate the reasons for differences in health by socio-economic circumstances, gender, area of residence, age, ethnic group, and family type. 4510 people are being followed for 20 years. The initial wave of data collection took place in 1987/8, when respondents were aged 15, 35 and 55. The final wave of data collection took place in 2007/08 when respondents were aged 35, 55 and 75. In this way the Twenty-07 Study provides us with unique opportunities to investigate both the changes in people's lives over 20 years and how they affect their health, and the differences in people's experiences at the same ages 20 years apart, and how these have different effects on their health.
The University of Reading Research Data Archive (the Archive) is a multidisciplinary online service for the registration, preservation and publication of research datasets produced or collected at the University of Reading.
Launchpad is a software collaboration platform that provides: Bug tracking, Code hosting using Bazaar, Code reviews Ubuntu package building and hosting, Translations, Mailing lists, Answer tracking and FAQs, Specification tracking. Launchpad can host your project’s source code using the Bazaar version control system
Content type(s)
RED is a collection of databases whose aim is to accumulate as much evidence as possible about reading experiences across the world. The search and browse facilities enable you to chart the reading tastes of individual readers as they travel to other countries, and consider how different environments may have affected their reading. You can track the readership of books issued in new editions for new audiences in different countries. Search results are displayed on an interactive map and linked to relevant records in national REDs. Each national RED offers a range of services to users, including profiles of readers, authors, and titles; tutorials on accessing and analysing evidence; and examples of how scholars have used the database to uncover patterns of reading.
The Africa Centre offers longitudinal datasets from a rural demographic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa where HIV prevalence is extremely high. The data may be filtered by demographics, years, or by individuals questionnaires. The Africa Centre requests notification that anyone contact them when downloading their data. Since January 2000, the Africa Centre For Population Health has built up an extensive longitudinal database of demographic, social, medical and economic information about the members of its Demographic Surveillance Area, which is situated in a rural area of northern KwaZulu-Natal. It has developed from this database, the following suite of datasets which can be used both internally within the organisation, and by other researchers.
!! OFFLINE !! A recent computer security audit has revealed security flaws in the legacy HapMap site that require NCBI to take it down immediately. We regret the inconvenience, but we are required to do this. That said, NCBI was planning to decommission this site in the near future anyway (although not quite so suddenly), as the 1,000 genomes (1KG) project has established itself as a research standard for population genetics and genomics. NCBI has observed a decline in usage of the HapMap dataset and website with its available resources over the past five years and it has come to the end of its useful life. The International HapMap Project is a multi-country effort to identify and catalog genetic similarities and differences in human beings. Using the information in the HapMap, researchers will be able to find genes that affect health, disease, and individual responses to medications and environmental factors. The Project is a collaboration among scientists and funding agencies from Japan, the United Kingdom, Canada, China, Nigeria, and the United States. All of the information generated by the Project will be released into the public domain. The goal of the International HapMap Project is to compare the genetic sequences of different individuals to identify chromosomal regions where genetic variants are shared. By making this information freely available, the Project will help biomedical researchers find genes involved in disease and responses to therapeutic drugs. In the initial phase of the Project, genetic data are being gathered from four populations with African, Asian, and European ancestry. Ongoing interactions with members of these populations are addressing potential ethical issues and providing valuable experience in conducting research with identified populations. Public and private organizations in six countries are participating in the International HapMap Project. Data generated by the Project can be downloaded with minimal constraints. The Project officially started with a meeting in October 2002 (https://www.genome.gov/10005336/) and is expected to take about three years.
The Malaria Atlas Project (MAP) brings together researchers based around the world with expertise in a wide range of disciplines from public health to mathematics, geography and epidemiology. We work together to generate new and innovative methods of mapping malaria risk. Ultimately our goal is to produce a comprehensive range of maps and estimates that will support effective planning of malaria control at national and international scales.
EMAGE (e-Mouse Atlas of Gene Expression) is an online biological database of gene expression data in the developing mouse (Mus musculus) embryo. The data held in EMAGE is spatially annotated to a framework of 3D mouse embryo models produced by EMAP (e-Mouse Atlas Project). These spatial annotations allow users to query EMAGE by spatial pattern as well as by gene name, anatomy term or Gene Ontology (GO) term. EMAGE is a freely available web-based resource funded by the Medical Research Council (UK) and based at the MRC Human Genetics Unit in the Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Edinburgh, UK.
>>>!!!<<< as stated 2017-06-09 MPIDB is no longer available under URL http://www.jcvi.org/mpidb/about.php >>>!!!<<< The microbial protein interaction database (MPIDB) aims to collect and provide all known physical microbial interactions. Currently, 24,295 experimentally determined interactions among proteins of 250 bacterial species/strains can be browsed and downloaded. These microbial interactions have been manually curated from the literature or imported from other databases (IntAct, DIP, BIND, MINT) and are linked to 26,578 experimental evidences (PubMed ID, PSI-MI methods). In contrast to these databases, interactions in MPIDB are further supported by 68,346 additional evidences based on interaction conservation, protein complex membership, and 3D domain contacts (iPfam, 3did). We do not include (spoke/matrix) binary interactions infered from pull-down experiments.
GeoCommons is the public community of GeoIQ users who are building an open repository of data and maps for the world. The GeoIQ platform includes a large number of features that empower you to easily access, visualize and analyze your data. The GeoIQ platform powers the growing GeoCommons community of over 25,000 members actively creating and sharing hundreds of thousands of datasets and maps across the world. With GeoCommons, anyone can contribute and share open data, easily build shareable maps and collaborate with others.
The Virtual Liver Network (VLN) represents a major research investment by the German Government focusing on work at the “bleeding edge” of Systems Biology and Systems Medicine. This Flagship Programme is tackling one of the major challenges in the life sciences: that is, how to integrate the wealth of data we have acquired post-genome, not just in a mathematical model, but more importantly in a series of models that are linked across scales to represent organ function. As the project is prototyping how to achieve true multi-scale modelling within a single organ and linking this to human physiology, it will be developing tools and protocols that can be applied to other systems, helping to drive forward the application of modelling and simulation to modern medical practice. It is the only programme of its type to our knowledge that bridges investigations from the sub-cellular through to ethically cleared patient and volunteer studies in an integrated workflow. As such, this programme is contributing significantly to the development of a new paradigm in biology and medicine.
Research Data Leeds is the institutional research data repository for the University of Leeds. The service aims to facilitate data discovery and data sharing. The repository houses data generated by researchers at the University of Leeds.