Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 367 result(s)
STRING is a database of known and predicted protein interactions. The interactions include direct (physical) and indirect (functional) associations; they are derived from four sources: - Genomic Context - High-throughput Experiments - (Conserved) Coexpression - Previous Knowledge STRING quantitatively integrates interaction data from these sources for a large number of organisms, and transfers information between these organisms where applicable.
Country
BRENDA is the main collection of enzyme functional data available to the scientific community worldwide. The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. It is available free of charge for via the internet (http://www.brenda-enzymes.org/) and as an in-house database for commercial users (requests to our distributor Biobase). The enzymes are classified according to the Enzyme Commission list of enzymes. Some 5000 "different" enzymes are covered. Frequently enzymes with very different properties are included under the same EC number. BRENDA includes biochemical and molecular information on classification, nomenclature, reaction, specificity, functional parameters, occurrence, enzyme structure, application, engineering, stability, disease, isolation, and preparation. The database also provides additional information on ligands, which function as natural or in vitro substrates/products, inhibitors, activating compounds, cofactors, bound metals, and other attributes.
Country
CBS offers Comprehensive public databases of DNA- and protein sequences, macromolecular structure, g ene and protein expression levels, pathway organization and cell signalling, have been established to optimise scientific exploitation of the explosion of data within biology. Unlike many other groups in the field of biomolecular informatics, Center for Biological Sequence Analysis directs its research primarily towards topics related to the elucidation of the functional aspects of complex biological mechanisms. Among contemporary bioinformatics concerns are reliable computational interpretation of a wide range of experimental data, and the detailed understanding of the molecular apparatus behind cellular mechanisms of sequence information. By exploiting available experimental data and evidence in the design of algorithms, sequence correlations and other features of biological significance can be inferred. In addition to the computational research the center also has experimental efforts in gene expression analysis using DNA chips and data generation in relation to the physical and structural properties of DNA. In the last decade, the Center for Biological Sequence Analysis has produced a large number of computational methods, which are offered to others via WWW servers.
The IMEx consortium is an international collaboration between a group of major public interaction data providers who have agreed to share curation effort and develop and work to a single set of curation rules when capturing data from both directly deposited interaction data or from publications in peer-reviewed journals, capture full details of an interaction in a “deep” curation model, perform a complete curation of all protein-protein interactions experimentally demonstrated within a publication, make these interaction available in a single search interface on a common website, provide the data in standards compliant download formats, make all IMEx records freely accessible under the Creative Commons Attribution License
IntAct provides a freely available, open source database system and analysis tools for molecular interaction data. All interactions are derived from literature curation or direct user submissions and are freely available.
UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot is the manually annotated and reviewed section of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB). It is a high quality annotated and non-redundant protein sequence database, which brings together experimental results, computed features and scientific conclusions. Since 2002, it is maintained by the UniProt consortium and is accessible via the UniProt website.
The CancerData site is an effort of the Medical Informatics and Knowledge Engineering team (MIKE for short) of Maastro Clinic, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Our activities in the field of medical image analysis and data modelling are visible in a number of projects we are running. CancerData is offering several datasets. They are grouped in collections and can be public or private. You can search for public datasets in the NBIA (National Biomedical Imaging Archive) image archives without logging in.
The Benchmark Energy & Geometry Database (BEGDB) collects results of highly accurate QM calculations of molecular structures, energies and properties. These data can serve as benchmarks for testing and parameterization of other computational methods.
EMBL-EBI provides freely available data from life science experiments covering the full spectrum of molecular biology.The EBI Metagenomics service is an automated pipeline for the analysis and archiving of metagenomic data that aims to provide insights into the phylogenetic diversity as well as the functional and metabolic potential of a sample.
MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human health and disease. The projects contributing to this resource are: Mouse Genome Database (MGD) Project, Gene Expression Database (GXD) Project, Mouse Tumor Biology (MTB) Database Project, Gene Ontology (GO) Project at MGI, MouseMine Project, MouseCyc Project at MGI
The Stanford Microarray Database (SMD) is a DNA microarray research database that provides a large amount of data for public use.
caNanoLab is a data sharing portal designed to facilitate information sharing in the biomedical nanotechnology research community to expedite and validate the use of nanotechnology in biomedicine. caNanoLab provides support for the annotation of nanomaterials with characterizations resulting from physico-chemical and in vitro assays and the sharing of these characterizations and associated nanotechnology protocols in a secure fashion.
Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) is a catalogue/compendium of inherited disorders, other (single-locus) traits, and genes in 218 animal species (other than human and mouse and rats, which have their own resources) authored by Professor Frank Nicholas of the University of Sydney, Australia, with help from many people over the years. OMIA information is stored in a database that contains textual information and references, as well as links to relevant PubMed and Gene records at the NCBI, and to OMIM and Ensembl.
The Structure database provides three-dimensional structures of macromolecules for a variety of research purposes and allows the user to retrieve structures for specific molecule types as well as structures for genes and proteins of interest. Three main databases comprise Structure-The Molecular Modeling Database; Conserved Domains and Protein Classification; and the BioSystems Database. Structure also links to the PubChem databases to connect biological activity data to the macromolecular structures. Users can locate structural templates for proteins and interactively view structures and sequence data to closely examine sequence-structure relationships.
The Entrez Protein Clusters database contains annotation information, publications, structures and analysis tools for related protein sequences encoded by complete genomes. The data available in the Protein Clusters Database is generated from prokaryotic genomic studies and is intended to assist researchers studying micro-organism evolution as well as other biological sciences. Available genomes include plants and viruses as well as organelles and microbial genomes.
The DOE Data Explorer (DDE) is an information tool to help you locate DOE's collections of data and non-text information and, at the same time, retrieve individual datasets within some of those collections. It includes collection citations prepared by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, as well as citations for individual datasets submitted from DOE Data Centers and other organizations.
The Database of Genomic Variants archive provides curated archiving and distribution of publicly available genomic structural variants. Direct submissions are accepted as well as published data. The DGVa is the primary supplier of data to the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV) (hosted by The Centre for Applied Genomics in Toronto, Canada).
OMIM is a comprehensive, authoritative compendium of human genes and genetic phenotypes that is freely available and updated daily. OMIM is authored and edited at the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, under the direction of Dr. Ada Hamosh. Its official home is omim.org.
Country
Xanthobase provides information on Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae (Xoo), the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogenic bacterium in which genome sequencing has revealed very extensive race differentiation. The whole genome sequence of its native host has also been completed, and analysis of the host parasite interaction on the basis of the two genomes can be expected to be useful.
Gramene is a platform for comparative genomic analysis of agriculturally important grasses, including maize, rice, sorghum, wheat and barley. Relationships between cereals are queried and displayed using controlled vocabularies (Gene, Plant, Trait, Environment, and Gramene Taxonomy) and web-based displays, including the Genes and Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) modules.
Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB) coordinates research and education in bioinformatics throughout Switzerland and provides bioinformatics services to the national and international research community. ExPASy gives access to numerous repositories and databases of SIB. For example: array map, MetaNetX, SWISS-MODEL and World-2DPAGE, and many others see a list here http://www.expasy.org/resources
VectorBase provides data on arthropod vectors of human pathogens. Sequence data, gene expression data, images, population data, and insecticide resistance data for arthropod vectors are available for download. VectorBase also offers genome browser, gene expression and microarray repository, and BLAST searches for all VectorBase genomes. VectorBase Genomes include Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae, Culex quinquefasciatus, Ixodes scapularis, Pediculus humanus, Rhodnius prolixus. VectorBase is one the Bioinformatics Resource Centers (BRC) projects which is funded by National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NAID).
The HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) assigned unique gene symbols and names to over 35,000 human loci, of which around 19,000 are protein coding. This curated online repository of HGNC-approved gene nomenclature and associated resources includes links to genomic, proteomic and phenotypic information, as well as dedicated gene family pages.
BeetleBase is a comprehensive sequence database and important community resource for Tribolium genetics, genomics and developmental biology. It provides genetic data on the Tribolium Castaneum, Red Flour Beetle, as gene maps, official gene set, reference sequences, predicted models, and whole-genome tiling array representing developmental stages.