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Found 29 result(s)
The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created in late 2006 to serve PIs funded by the NSF Geosciences Directorate (GEO) Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) Biological and Chemical Oceanography Programs and Office of Polar Programs (OPP) Antarctic Sciences (ANT) Organisms & Ecosystems Program. The BCO-DMO is a combination the Data Management Offices formerly created to support the US JGOFS and US GLOBEC programs. The BCO-DMO staff members are the curators of the legacy data collections created by those respective programs, as well as many other more recent research efforts including those of individual investigators.
World Data Center for Oceanography serves to store and provide to users data on physical, chemical and dynamical parameters of the global ocean as well as oceanography-related papers and publications, which are either came from other countries through the international exchange or provided to the international exchange by organizations of the Russian Federation
MEMENTO aims to become a valuable tool for identifying regions of the world ocean that should be targeted in future work to improve the quality of air-sea flux estimates.
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GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is one of the leading marine science institutions in Europe. GEOMAR investigates the chemical, physical, biological, and geological processes in the oceans, as well as their interactions with the seafloor and the atmosphere. OceanRep is an open access digital collection containing the research output of GEOMAR staff and students. Included are journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, theses and more, - with fulltext, if available. Research data are linked to the publications entries.
Country
The Great Lakes Precipitation Network holds a unique and extensive data set on chemical contaminants in precipitation for the Canadian Great Lakes Basin. The list of persistent chemical contaminants being monitored include: organochlorine pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, PCBs, flame retardants, and PFOS.
PISCO researchers collect biological, chemical, and physical data about ocean ecosystems in the nearshore portions of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem. Data are archived and used to create summaries and graphics, in order to ensure that the data can be used and understood by a diverse audience of managers, policy makers, scientists and the general public.
Global Ocean Ecosystem Dynamics (GLOBEC) is the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) core project responsible for understanding how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations. The programme was initiated by SCOR and the IOC of UNESCO in 1991, to understand how global change will affect the abundance, diversity and productivity of marine populations comprising a major component of oceanic ecosystems. The aim of GLOBEC is to advance our understanding of the structure and functioning of the global ocean ecosystem, its major subsystems, and its response to physical forcing so that a capability can be developed to forecast the responses of the marine ecosystem to global change. U.S. GLOBEC Programm includes the Georges Bank / NW Atlantic Programm, the Northeast Pacific Programm and the Southern Ocean Program.
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The Ocean Date and Information System provides information on physical, chemical, biological and geological parameters of ocean and coasts on spatial and temporal domains that is vital for both research and operational oceanography. In-situ and remote sensing data are included. The Ocean Information Bank is supported by the data received from Ocean Observing Systems in the Indian Ocean (both the in-situ platforms and satellites) as well as by a chain of Marine Data Centres. Ocean and coastal measurements are available. Data products are accessible through various portals on the site and are largely available by data type (in situ or remote sensing) and then by parameter.
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Ocean Networks Canada maintains several observatories installed in three different regions in the world's oceans. All three observatories are cabled systems that can provide power and high bandwidth communiction paths to sensors in the ocean. The infrastructure supports near real-time observations from multiple instruments and locations distributed across the Arctic, NEPTUNE and VENUS observatory networks. These observatories collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological aspects of the ocean over long time periods, supporting research on complex Earth processes in ways not previously possible.
The U.S. launched the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) in the late 1980s to study the ocean carbon cycle. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. As we studied ocean biogeochemistry, we learned that our simple views of carbon uptake and transport were severely limited, and a new "wave" of ocean science was born. U.S. JGOFS has been supported primarily by the U.S. National Science Foundation in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Department of Energy and the Office of Naval Research. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP).
The British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) is a national facility for looking after and distributing data concerning the marine environmentWe deal with biological, chemical, physical and geophysical data, and our databases contain measurements of nearly 22,000 different variables. Many of our staff have direct experience of marine data collection and analysis. They work alongside information technology specialists to ensure that data are documented and stored for current and future use.
PetDB, the Petrological Database, is a web-based data management system that provides on-line access to geochemical and petrological data. PetDB is a global synthesis of chemical, isotopic, and mineralogical data for rocks, minerals, and melt inclusions. PetDB's current content focuses on data for igneous and metamorphic rocks from the ocean floor, specifically mid-ocean ridge basalts and abyssal peridotites and xenolith samples from the Earth's mantle and lower crust. PetDB is maintained and continuously updated as part of the EarthChem data collections.
SeaDataNet is a standardized system for managing the large and diverse data sets collected by the oceanographic fleets and the automatic observation systems. The SeaDataNet infrastructure network and enhance the currently existing infrastructures, which are the national oceanographic data centres of 35 countries, active in data collection. The networking of these professional data centres, in a unique virtual data management system provide integrated data sets of standardized quality on-line. As a research infrastructure, SeaDataNet contributes to build research excellence in Europe.
The National Oceanographic Data Center includes the National Coastal Data Development Center (NCDDC) and the NOAA Central Library, which are integrated to provide access to the world's most comprehensive sources of marine environmental data and information. NODC maintains and updates a national ocean archive with environmental data acquired from domestic and foreign activities and produces products and research from these data which help monitor global environmental changes. These data include physical, biological and chemical measurements derived from in situ oceanographic observations, satellite remote sensing of the oceans, and ocean model simulations.
SCISAT, also known as the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (ACE), is a Canadian Space Agency small satellite mission for remote sensing of the Earth's atmosphere using solar occultation. The satellite was launched on 12 August 2003 and continues to function perfectly. The primary mission goal is to improve our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes that control the distribution of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere, particularly in the Arctic. The high precision and accuracy of solar occultation makes SCISAT useful for monitoring changes in atmospheric composition and the validation of other satellite instruments. The satellite carries two instruments. A high resolution (0.02 cm-¹) infrared Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) operating from 2 to 13 microns (750-4400 cm-¹) is measuring the vertical distribution of trace gases, particles and temperature. This provides vertical profiles of atmospheric constituents including essentially all of the major species associated with ozone chemistry. Aerosols and clouds are monitored using the extinction of solar radiation at 1.02 and 0.525 microns as measured by two filtered imagers. The vertical resolution of the FTS is about 3-4 km from the cloud tops up to about 150 km. Peter Bernath of the University of Waterloo is the principal investigator. A dual optical spectrograph called MAESTRO (Measurement of Aerosol Extinction in the Stratosphere and Troposphere Retrieved by Occultation) covers the 400-1030 nm spectral region and measures primarily ozone, nitrogen dioxide and aerosol/cloud extinction. It has a vertical resolution of about 1-2 km. Tom McElroy of Environment and Climate Change Canada is the principal investigator. ACE data are freely available from the University of Waterloo website. SCISAT was designated an ESA Third Party Mission in 2005. ACE data are freely available through an ESA portal.
The European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) is a scientifically based and policy driven programme under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (CLRTAP) for international co-operation to solve transboundary air pollution problems.
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The World Data Centre for Aerosols (WDCA) is the data repository and archive for microphysical, optical, and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosol of the World Meteorological Organisation's (WMO) Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme. The goal of the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) programme is to ensure long-term measurements in order to detect trends in global distributions of chemical constituents in air and the reasons for them. With respect to aerosols, the objective of GAW is to determine the spatio-temporal distribution of aerosol properties related to climate forcing and air quality on multi-decadal time scales and on regional, hemispheric and global spatial scales.
The Environmental Change Network is the UK’s long-term environmental monitoring and research (LTER) programme. We make regular measurements of plant and animal communities and their physical and chemical environment. Our long-term datasets are used to increase understanding of the effects of climate change, air pollution and other environmental pressures on UK ecosystems.
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The National Atmospheric Chemistry Database (NAtChem) is a data archival and analysis facility operated by the Science and Technology Branch of Environment and Climate Change Canada. The purpose of the NAtChem database is to enhance atmospheric research through the archival and analysis of North American air and precipitation chemistry data. Such research includes investigations into the chemical nature of the atmosphere, atmospheric processes, spatial and temporal patterns, source-receptor relationships and long range transport of air pollutants. The NAtChem Database contains air and precipitation chemistry data from many major regional-scale networks in North America. To contribute to NAtChem, networks must operate for a period of at least two years, must have wide area coverage, and must have regionally-representative sites (rural and background).
The Water Survey has flourished for more than a century by anticipating and responding to new challenges and opportunities to serve the citizens of Illinois. Today, the ISWS continues to demonstrate flexibility and adaptability by developing new programs, while continuing to provide long-standing services upon which Illinoisans have come to rely. The Scientific Surveys of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are the primary agencies in Illinois responsible for producing and disseminating scientific and technological information, services, and products related to the environment, economic development, and quality of life. To achieve this mission, the Scientific Surveys conduct state-of-the-art research and collect, analyze, archive, and disseminate high-quality, objective data and technical information. The information, services, and products provide a sound technical basis for the citizens and policymakers of Illinois and the nation to make wise social, economic, and environmental decisions.
The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) for biogeochemical dynamics is one of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) data centers managed by the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) Project. The ORNL DAAC archives data produced by NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program. The DAAC provides data and information relevant to biogeochemical dynamics, ecological data, and environmental processes, critical for understanding the dynamics relating to the biological, geological, and chemical components of Earth's environment.
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The Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) pursues multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary work to advance understanding of temperate marine, Southern Ocean, and Antarctic environments. IMAS research is characterised as innovative, relevant, and globally distinctive. Education at IMAS delivers world class programs, resulting in highly trained graduates who serve the needs of academic institutions, industry, government, and the community. IMAS is naturally advantaged by its Southern Ocean location proximal to Antarctica, and hosts one of the world's largest critical masses of marine and Antarctic researchers. IMAS also operate facilities and host data sets of national and global interest and to the benefit of the community. The guiding framework of IMAS is that all data that are not commercial-in-confidence or restricted by legislation or agreement are owned by the University on behalf of the community or Commonwealth, are hosted by an organisation, and are shared with researchers for analysis and interpretation. IMAS is committed to the concept of Open Data. The IMAS Data Portal is an online interface showcasing the IMAS metadata catalogue and all available IMAS data. The portal aims to make IMAS data freely and openly available for the benefit of Australian marine and environmental science as a whole.
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At 2016-05-29 sees the official merger of the IMOS eMarine Information Infrastructure (eMII) Facility and the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) into a single entity. The marine information Facility of IMOS is now the AODN. Enabling open access to marine data is core business for IMOS. The IMOS data will continue to be discoverable alongside a wider collection of Australian marine and climate data via the new-look AODN Portal. Visit the AODN Portal at http://portal.aodn.org.au/ . - IMOS is designed to be a fully-integrated, national system, observing at ocean-basin and regional scales, and covering physical, chemical and biological variables. IMOS observations are guided by science planning undertaken collaboratively across the Nodes of the Australian marine and climate science community with input from government, industry and other stakeholders. There are five major research themes that unify IMOS science plans and related observations: Long-term ocean change, Climate variability and weather extremes, Boundary currents, Continental shelf and coastal processes, and Ecosystem responses. The observations and data streams are collected via ten technology platforms, or Facilities.