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The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) electronic database comprised of health studies of DOE contract workers and environmental studies of areas surrounding DOE facilities. DOE recognizes the benefits of data sharing and supports the public's right to know about worker and community health risks. CEDR provides independent researchers and the public with access to de-identified data collected since the Department's early production years. Current CEDR holdings include more than 80 studies of over 1 million workers at 31 DOE sites. Access to these data is at no cost to the user. Most of CEDR's holdings are derived from epidemiologic studies of DOE workers at many large nuclear weapons plants, such as Hanford, Los Alamos, the Oak Ridge reservation, Savannah River Site, and Rocky Flats. These studies primarily use death certificate information to identify excess deaths and patterns of disease among workers to determine what factors contribute to the risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. In addition, many of these studies have radiation exposure measurements on individual workers. CEDR is supported by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Now a mature system in routine operational use, CEDR's modern internet-based systems respond to thousands of requests to its web server daily. With about 1,500 Internet sites pointing to CEDR's web site, CEDR is a national user facility, with a large audience for data that are not available elsewhere.
The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is a comprehensive clearinghouse of information about advanced transportation technologies. The AFDC offers transportation decision makers unbiased information, data, and tools related to the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The AFDC launched in 1991 in response to the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. It originally served as a repository for alternative fuel performance data. The AFDC has since evolved to offer a broad array of information resources that support efforts to reduce petroleum use in transportation. The AFDC serves Clean Cities stakeholders, fleets regulated by the Energy Policy Act, businesses, policymakers, government agencies, and the general public.
CRAWDAD is the Community Resource for Archiving Wireless Data, a wireless network data resource for the research community. This archive has the capacity to store wireless trace data from many contributing locations, and staff to develop better tools for collecting, anonymizing, and analyzing the data. We work with community leaders to ensure that the archive meets the needs of the research community.
Lab Notes Online presents historic scientific data from the Caltech Archives' collections in digital facsimile. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the first publication in the series is Robert A. Millikan's notebooks for his oil drop experiments to measure the charge of the electron, dating from October 1911 to April 1912. Other laboratory, field, or research notes will be added to the archive over time.
Cell phones have become an important platform for the understanding of social dynamics and influence, because of their pervasiveness, sensing capabilities, and computational power. Many applications have emerged in recent years in mobile health, mobile banking, location based services, media democracy, and social movements. With these new capabilities, we can potentially be able to identify exact points and times of infection for diseases, determine who most influences us to gain weight or become healthier, know exactly how information flows among employees and productivity emerges in our work spaces, and understand how rumors spread. In an attempt to address these challenges, we release several mobile data sets here in "Reality Commons" that contain the dynamics of several communities of about 100 people each. We invite researchers to propose and submit their own applications of the data to demonstrate the scientific and business values of these data sets, suggest how to meaningfully extend these experiments to larger populations, and develop the math that fits agent-based models or systems dynamics models to larger populations. These data sets were collected with tools developed in the MIT Human Dynamics Lab and are now available as open source projects or at cost.
The Clean Energy Project Database (CEPDB) is a massive reference database for organic semiconductors with a particular emphasis on photovoltaic applications. It was created to store and provide access to data from computational as well as experimental studies, on both known and virtual compounds. It is a free and open resource designed to support researchers in the field of organic electronics in their scientific pursuits. The CEPDB was established as part of the Harvard Clean Energy Project (CEP), a virtual high-throughput screening initiative to identify promising new candidates for the next generation of carbon-based solar cell materials.
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The version 1.0 of the open database contains 1,151,268 brain signals of 2 seconds each, captured with the stimulus of seeing a digit (from 0 to 9) and thinking about it, over the course of almost 2 years between 2014 & 2015, from a single Test Subject David Vivancos. All the signals have been captured using commercial EEGs (not medical grade), NeuroSky MindWave, Emotiv EPOC, Interaxon Muse & Emotiv Insight, covering a total of 19 Brain (10/20) locations.
IoT Lab is a research platform exploring the potential of crowdsourcing and Internet of Things for multidisciplinary research with more end-user interactions. IoT Lab is a European Research project which aims at researching the potential of crowdsourcing to extend IoT testbed infrastructure for multidisciplinary experiments with more end-user interactions. It addresses topics such as: - Crowdsourcing mechanisms and tools; - “Crowdsourcing-driven research”; - Virtualization of crowdsourcing and testbeds; - Ubiquitous Interconnection and Cloudification of testbeds; - Testbed as a Service platform; - Multidisciplinary experiments; - End-user and societal value creation; - Privacy and personal data protection.