Filter
Reset all

Subjects

Content Types

Countries

AID systems

API

Certificates

Data access

Data access restrictions

Database access

Database access restrictions

Database licenses

Data licenses

Data upload

Data upload restrictions

Enhanced publication

Institution responsibility type

Institution type

Keywords

Metadata standards

PID systems

Provider types

Quality management

Repository languages

Software

Syndications

Repository types

Versioning

  • * at the end of a keyword allows wildcard searches
  • " quotes can be used for searching phrases
  • + represents an AND search (default)
  • | represents an OR search
  • - represents a NOT operation
  • ( and ) implies priority
  • ~N after a word specifies the desired edit distance (fuzziness)
  • ~N after a phrase specifies the desired slop amount
Found 260 result(s)
Country
The Khazar University Institutional Repository (KUIR), a suite of services offered by the Library Information Center, is an institutional repository maintained to support the university's researchers, collaborators, and students. Repository content consists of collections of research materials in digital format produced and selected by Khazar University faculty and their collaborators.
Country
PRISM is a digital archive of the university's intellectual output. Established and maintained by Libraries and Cultural Resources to manage, preserve and make available the academic works of faculty, students and research groups. The collection includes faculty publications, masters and doctoral theses, and research output from across Southern Alberta. PRISM is updated regularly, with new works added daily.
The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is a team of researchers, data specialists and computer system developers who are supporting the development of a data management system to store scientific data generated by Gulf of Mexico researchers. The Master Research Agreement between BP and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance that established the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) included provisions that all data collected or generated through the agreement must be made available to the public. The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative Information and Data Cooperative (GRIIDC) is the vehicle through which GoMRI is fulfilling this requirement. The mission of GRIIDC is to ensure a data and information legacy that promotes continual scientific discovery and public awareness of the Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem.
Stanford Network Analysis Platform (SNAP) is a general purpose network analysis and graph mining library. It is written in C++ and easily scales to massive networks with hundreds of millions of nodes, and billions of edges. It efficiently manipulates large graphs, calculates structural properties, generates regular and random graphs, and supports attributes on nodes and edges. SNAP is also available through the NodeXL which is a graphical front-end that integrates network analysis into Microsoft Office and Excel. The SNAP library is being actively developed since 2004 and is organically growing as a result of our research pursuits in analysis of large social and information networks. Largest network we analyzed so far using the library was the Microsoft Instant Messenger network from 2006 with 240 million nodes and 1.3 billion edges. The datasets available on the website were mostly collected (scraped) for the purposes of our research. The website was launched in July 2009.
DBpedia is a crowd-sourced community effort to extract structured information from Wikipedia and make this information available on the Web. DBpedia allows you to ask sophisticated queries against Wikipedia, and to link the different data sets on the Web to Wikipedia data. We hope that this work will make it easier for the huge amount of information in Wikipedia to be used in some new interesting ways. Furthermore, it might inspire new mechanisms for navigating, linking, and improving the encyclopedia itself.
The Data Catalogue is a service that allows University of Liverpool Researchers to create records of information about their finalised research data, and save those data in a secure online environment. The Data Catalogue provides a good means of making that data available in a structured way, in a form that can be discovered by both general search engines and academic search tools. There are two types of record that can be created in the Data Catalogue: A discovery-only record – in these cases, the research data may be held somewhere else but a record is provided to help people find it. A record is created that alerts users to the existence of the data, and provides a link to where those data are held. A discovery and data record – in these cases, a record is created to help people discover the data exist, and the data themselves are deposited into the Data Catalogue. This process creates a unique Digital Object identifier (DOI) which can be used in citations to the data.
KU ScholarWorks is the digital repository of the University of Kansas. It contains scholarly work created by KU faculty, staff and students, as well as material from the University Archives. KU ScholarWorks makes important research and historical items available to a wider audience and helps assure their long-term preservation.
MTSA is a Metropolitan Travel Survey Archive to store, preserve, and make publicly available, via the internet, travel surveys conducted by metropolitan areas, states and localities. As a result of cooperation from several agencies, we now have been able to post databases along with relevant documentation for many regions in the archive http://www.surveyarchive.org/archive.html . The databases and the documentation can be obtained from this website. In addition to making these databases publicly available, we are also in the process of converting all the databases to a common format to enhance the readability and usability of each survey, so many surveys can be used online, see analyze http://www.surveyarchive.org/analyze.html. The results from the first year of the project, along with issues related to archiving travel survey data are provided in our reports page http://www.surveyarchive.org/reports.html . Papers written by Yacov Zahavi, an instrumental figure in the development of travel surveys, are also provided here.
DataBank is a repository that will keep data safe in the long term. It can automatically obtain a Digital Object Indicator (DOI) for each data package, and make the metadata and/or the underlying data searchable and accessible by the wider world.
nanoHUB.org is the premier place for computational nanotechnology research, education, and collaboration. Our site hosts a rapidly growing collection of Simulation Programs for nanoscale phenomena that run in the cloud and are accessible through a web browser. In addition to simulation devices, nanoHUB provides Online Presentations, Courses, Learning Modules, Podcasts, Animations, Teaching Materials, and more. These resources help users learn about our simulation programs and about nanotechnology in general. Our site offers researchers a venue to explore, collaborate, and publish content, as well. Much of these collaborative efforts occur via Workspaces and User groups.
This database and dataset collection is part of the Institutional Repository of San Ignacio de Loyola University. The institutional repository of the Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola houses the academic papers of our study center and allows free access to them by researchers and the community in general, in addition to the exchange of information with all entities that produce Similar contents. Books, magazines, teaching materials, theses, files and databases, among others, are combined in a single space freely available.
GroupLens is a research lab in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities specializing in recommender systems, online communities, mobile and ubiquitous technologies, digital libraries, and local geographic information systems.
Country
data.deic.dk is an online data storage and synchronization service provided by the Danish e-Infrastructure Cooperation (DeIC), specifically aimed at researchers and scientists at Danish academic institutions. The service is primarily intended for working with and sharing active research data as well as for safekeeping of large datasets. Such data can be put in an area ('/Data') that is specifically not synced, i.e. not copied to desktops, laptops and mobile devices by the sync clients. Instead the data can be accessed and manipulated via the web interface, file transfer clients or the command line. The service is built on and with open-source software from the ground up: FreeBSD, ZFS, Apache, PHP, ownCloud+apps. DeIC is actively engaged in community efforts on developing such apps, and some are available as previews of things to come - including apps for getting large amounts of data into the system and tagging with meta-data. Our servers are attached directly to the 10-Gigabit backbone of "Forskningsnettet" - implying that wired up and download speed from Danish academic institutions is in principle comparable to those of an external USB hard drive.
The CMU Multi-Modal Activity Database (CMU-MMAC) database contains multimodal measures of the human activity of subjects performing the tasks involved in cooking and food preparation. The CMU-MMAC database was collected in Carnegie Mellon's Motion Capture Lab. A kitchen was built and to date twenty-five subjects have been recorded cooking five different recipes: brownies, pizza, sandwich, salad, and scrambled eggs.
DSpace@MIT is a service of the MIT Libraries to provide MIT faculty, researchers and their supporting communities stable, long-term storage for their digital research and teaching output and to maximize exposure of their content to a world audience. DSpace@MIT content includes conference papers, images, peer-reviewed scholarly articles, preprints, technical reports, theses, working papers, research datasets and more. This collection of more than 60,000 high-quality works is recognized as among the world's premier scholarly repositories and receives, on average, more than 1 million downloads per month.
The Abacus Dataverse Network is the research data repository of the British Columbia Research Libraries' Data Services, a collaboration involving the Data Libraries at Simon Fraser University (SFU), the University of British Columbia (UBC), the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) and the University of Victoria (UVic).
Edinburgh DataShare is an online digital repository of multi-disciplinary research datasets produced at the University of Edinburgh, hosted by the Data Library in Information Services. Edinburgh University researchers who have produced research data associated with an existing or forthcoming publication, or which has potential use for other researchers, are invited to upload their dataset for sharing and safekeeping. A persistent identifier and suggested citation will be provided.
Country
BABS include digital reproductions from the digitization of the Munich Digitisation CenterMunich Digitization Center/Digital Library of the Bavarian State Library including digital reproductions from copyright-free works from the BSB collections created by cooperation partners or service providers, such as digital copies from the The google-ProjectGoogle project; official publications of authorities, departments and agencies of the State of Bavaria according to the "Bavarian State Promulgation 2 December 2008 (Az.: B II 2-480-30)" on the delivery of official publications to libraries, the Promulgation Platform Bavaria (Verkündungsplattform), as well as voluntary deliveries of electronic publications of different (mainly Bavarian scientific) publishing houses and other publishers; scientifically relevant literature (open access publications and websites) of national and international origin in the Areas of Collection Emphasis of the BSB (history including classical studies, Eastern Europe, history of France and Italy, music, library science, book studies and information science) as well as Bavarica; electronic publications produced by the BSB specialist departments, especially those of the Center for Electronic Publishing (ZEP); local/regional/national licensed or purchased electronic publications
The Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) is the Department of Energy's (DOE) electronic database comprised of health studies of DOE contract workers and environmental studies of areas surrounding DOE facilities. DOE recognizes the benefits of data sharing and supports the public's right to know about worker and community health risks. CEDR provides independent researchers and the public with access to de-identified data collected since the Department's early production years. Current CEDR holdings include more than 80 studies of over 1 million workers at 31 DOE sites. Access to these data is at no cost to the user. Most of CEDR's holdings are derived from epidemiologic studies of DOE workers at many large nuclear weapons plants, such as Hanford, Los Alamos, the Oak Ridge reservation, Savannah River Site, and Rocky Flats. These studies primarily use death certificate information to identify excess deaths and patterns of disease among workers to determine what factors contribute to the risk of developing cancer and other illnesses. In addition, many of these studies have radiation exposure measurements on individual workers. CEDR is supported by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Now a mature system in routine operational use, CEDR's modern internet-based systems respond to thousands of requests to its web server daily. With about 1,500 Internet sites pointing to CEDR's web site, CEDR is a national user facility, with a large audience for data that are not available elsewhere.
The Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) is a comprehensive clearinghouse of information about advanced transportation technologies. The AFDC offers transportation decision makers unbiased information, data, and tools related to the deployment of alternative fuels and advanced vehicles. The AFDC launched in 1991 in response to the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. It originally served as a repository for alternative fuel performance data. The AFDC has since evolved to offer a broad array of information resources that support efforts to reduce petroleum use in transportation. The AFDC serves Clean Cities stakeholders, fleets regulated by the Energy Policy Act, businesses, policymakers, government agencies, and the general public.